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Best Leaf Shredder Reviews

Leaves can be difficult to deal with. In autumn, once all of the leaves have fallen, raking and bagging leaves can take a long time and a lot of space. It’s difficult to get all the leaves into a reasonable number of bags, especially if you have a lot of trees in your yard. This is where the best leaf shredder can help you. Grinding leaves into a smaller size means more can fit in each bag, making it easier to get the work done once and for all.

What Does a Leaf Shredder Do?

Leaf shredders have a grinding mechanism that will pulverize leaves and some small twigs as they’re dropped through. You feed the leaves from the top where they will be chopped up and dropped below into a bag, container, or just onto the ground.

Benefits of Getting a Good Leaf Shredder

What good does a leaf shredder actually do for you? Here are some of the benefits you’ll get from a shredder:

Fantastic Compost Sourcing

Leaves make a great addition to your compost pile, but they can take a long time to decompose when put in whole. Using a leaf shredder, you can chop leaves up into small pieces that will decompose very quickly in the compost. Instead of waiting for 3 – 6 months for the leaves to compost, you’ll have them ready in 1 – 2 months.

Using Leaf Shredder

Reduce Your Leaf Bags

Normally, leaves are difficult to force into a bag. There’s too much air between the whole leaves, so you can’t actually fill them up. When you grind up your leaves, you’ll get more than 8 times as many leaves in each bag, cutting down the number of bags you need significantly. It can be a slower process, but it’s worth it if you want to reduce your bags and make it easier to get rid of leaves. Come it with a great chainsaw and you’ll reduce all your yard waste down to small, easy to manage chunks instead of large piles!

Make Homemade Mulch

Ground up leaves aren’t just useful for compost; they’re also great for mulching. Since many leaf shredders are also able to grind up small twigs, you can make excellent mulch for your garden with leaves and twigs. They will be chopped up into small pieces that will evenly cover the garden with healthy, organic materials. This is also nice if you have an outdoor fish pond. Things like Koi fish pond filters will easily clog from wood mulch, but can handle most leaf pieces.

Top 5 Leaf Shredder Reviews Comparison Table

Product Name

Image

Debris Size Capacity

Cutting Blade Type

Power Source

Portability

Attachable Bags?

Our Rating

WORX Leaf Mulcher WG430

WORX Leaf Mulcher WG430

Leaves and small twigs

Cutting line

Electric, 13 Amps

Less than 20 lbs., breaks down for storage

Yes, sold separately

#1
Editor Choice

Flowtron LE-900 The Ultimate Mulcher

Flowtron LE-900 The Ultimate Mulcher

Leaves and small twigs

Cutting line + shaped blades

Electric, 5.9 Amps

17 lbs., carrying handles, foldaway storage

Yes, sold separately

#2

Sun Joe SDJ616 Shredder

Sun Joe SDJ616 Shredder

Leaves and small twigs

Cutting line

Electric, 13 Amps

13.4 lbs, compact storage

Yes, sold separately

#3

LawnMaster FD1501

LawnMaster FD1501

Leaves, branches up to 1 & ½ in.

Blades

Electric, 15 Amps

8 In. wheels, 25.4 lbs.

25.5” x 17.63” x 27.13” inches

#4

Sun Joe CJ601E

Sun Joe CJ601E

Leaves, branches up to 1 & ½ in.

Blades

Electric, 14 Amps

6 In. wheels,

Yes, sold separately

#5

How to Choose the Best Leaf Shredder

You need to look closely at the features of each machine before you make a purchase. What makes the best leaf shredder instead of a mediocre one? Here are some of the things to look at:

Debris Size

Different types of leaf shredders exist. Some are made exclusively for leaves and small twigs, while some also act as chipper shredders for branches as well. If you just want to grind leaves, getting a full chipper shredder will be a waste of money, and the grinding mechanism won’t be as effective for leaves. However, if you have multiple uses for your machine, a leaf shredder/chipper shredder combination might be a great choice for you.

Cutting Blade Type

Leaf shredders can use different mechanisms to grind up the leaves you drop into the feeder. Some use cutting line, similar to the line used in weed eaters. Others use actual metal blades that spin around and chop up leaves and other small materials. The large chipper shredder machines sometimes have bigger metal blades with sharper edges.

For leaves only, cutting line is a cheap and useful solution for chopping. You don’t need a lot of strength or power to cut up a bunch of leaves. Cutting line does a fine job and is very cheap to replace when it’s running low.

Power Source

Most leaf shredders today are electric, but the more powerful units are sometimes gas-powered instead. If you have a large yard with a lot of stuff to chop, a gas-powered machine might be useful. However, these are usually more expensive, heavier, and less portable.

Electric leaf shredders make up the majority of the best leaf shredder machines for the average homeowner. Those working commercially might look for gasoline machines, but most homeowners won’t need anything more powerful than an electric machine.

Portability

When you want to get your leaf shredder out and use it in the yard, it’s useful to be able to do that easily. A machine that’s lighter weight, has wheels, or can collapse for storage easily is an asset for the average person. Storage is especially important, since you don’t need a leaf shredder throughout most of the year and will use it most frequently in a period of a few months. If you’re getting a smaller machine, wheels or other features won’t be as necessary. But, larger machine can be quite heavy and may be difficult to move without wheels or some other feature.

Attachable Bags?

If you’re planning to bag up your leaves, being able to attach a bag to the bottom of the leaf shredder will be a big plus for you. That way, you won’t have to scoop up the small leaf pieces, and you can simply have them fall into the bag once they’re ground up. Some leaf shredders come with large bags that you can use to catch debris and spread it around for mulch, but others allow you to attach your own disposable bags to the bottom for catching pieces.

Conclusion

From the leaf shredders I’ve mentioned in the comparison table above, I would recommend the WORX Leaf Mulcher WG430 as best leaf shredder. It’s got a 13 Amp engine that’s powerful enough to spin the cutting line and chop leaves down to 1/11th of their normal size. It also breaks down easily for storage, so during the off-seasons you don’t have to have it taking up too much space in the garage or shed.

Best Expandable Hose Reviews

Garden hoses are something that every homeowner should have, whether it’s for washing the car, watering gardens, cleaning up outside, or anything else that needs water. But, hoses can be very frustrating, because they constantly tangle up and they are difficult to manoeuver around the yard when you need them. If you’ve ever yanked around a full garden hose, you know what I mean! Many people are turning to look for the best expandable hose as a possible solution to the frustration.

Using Expandable Hose

What is an Expandable Hose?

Expandable hoses consist of two layers of materials. They have and inner tube materials inside and a stretchable fabric material on the outside. When filled with water, the hose can get up to three times its dry length. That means that when the hose is dry, it’s flexible, small, and very convenient, but when it’s full of water it gets to be the size of a regular garden hose.

They’re not a perfect solution, because the technology isn’t that old and it hasn’t been perfected yet. Most complaints come from the materials that are used to make the hoses, since they are softer than a normal rubber hose. Leaks and tears can become more common with expandable hoses, if you’re not careful about which one you buy.

Expandable hoses are compatible with watering wands, sprinklers, spray nozzles, spigots, and everything else that a normal garden hose would attach to. They come with connectors of standard sizing.

Benefits of Expandable Hoses

When you buy the best expandable hose, you’re going to have a better experience than if you buy a cheap, low-quality version. Here are the benefits you’ll get from a good one:

No kinks or tangles

Even if you wrap it up and store it on the ground, or pull it around after you, it won’t get kinks and messy tangles the same way that a traditional garden hose does. That’s not to say that can’t get tied up at all, but it’s less common and won’t be as bad of a knot.

Lightweight

Since the materials are expandable and softer, you won’t have to use as much muscle to pick up or drag around and expandable hose. They’re not as heavy and cumbersome as traditional hoses, make them a great choice for people with a little less arm strength.

Less space needed for storage

Expandable hoses are significantly smaller when they’re not full of water than when you’re using them. This makes it really easy to store them, although you won’t be able to use a hose reel, because the expanding hose would destroy itself if it wasn’t fully unwound before use. In any case, you won’t really need a hose reel, since these hoses take up so little space and can be easily put away, because they’re flexible.

Self-draining once the water is off

It’s easy to winterize or drain an expandable hose, since most of them do it automatically once you turn the water off. The motion of the hose returning to its smaller size will squeeze the water out and make the hose dry again inside.

Top 5 Expandable Hose Reviews Comparison Table

Product Name

Image

Length

Hose Materials

Connector Materials

Shut-Off Valve

Additional Pieces Included

Warranty

Our Rating

LawnPRO Expanding Garden Hose

LawnPRO Expanding Garden Hose

50 ft. EXPANDED

5,000 Denier woven fabric

Copper + Steel

No

Storage bag

12 months

#1
Editor Choice

Gardenirvana Expandable Hose

Gardenirvana Expandable Hose

50 ft. EXPANDED

Triple Latex core

Brass

Yes

Hanger, spray nozzle, splitter, and storage bag

12 months

#2

Ohuhu Super Strong Garden Hose

Ohuhu Super Strong Garden Hose

25, 50, 75, or 100 ft. EXPANDED

Pressure-resistant Latex

Brass

Yes

Spray nozzle

N/A

#3

GrowGreen Expandable Garden Hose

GrowGreen Expandable Garden Hose

25, 50, 75, or 100 ft. EXPANDED

Triple layer Latex

Brass

Yes

Spray nozzle

12 months

#4

ProLawn Expandable Water Hose

ProLawn Expandable Water Hose

50 ft. EXPANDED

Triple layer Latex

Brass

Yes

Spray nozzle

6 months

#5

How to Choose the Best Expandable Hose

What are the features of the best expandable hose? Here is what you should be looking at:

Length

Most people buy hoses because of hose long they are, so this is probably the most important thing if you want the hose to be useful to you. Keep in mind that some expandable hoses (but not all) will tell you their dry length versus their fully expanded length. There should be a great difference between these two numbers, with the expanded length usually being around 3 times as long as the dry length.

Hose Materials

Expandable hoses are made of two layers of material on the actual hose itself. The most important material will be the inner tube, because this is the part that usually ruptures or bursts under pressure. Latex is one of the strongest materials available, but it’s not a perfect fit for the hose. If used with brass connectors, a chemical reaction can happen that will cause the hose to be more prone to bursting at the seams. Unfortunately, this is also seen as one of the strongest combinations of materials, so it’s a common pairing.

Connector Materials

Valves are made of some type of solid metal or plastic. Brass and copper are the most common metals used, and plastic is only used on low-end products, since it’s not as durable as metal. If you have a hose with brass connectors, don’t use it for drinking water regularly, since brace contains trace amounts of lead. It’s fine for use with gardens, cleaning, and other outdoor applications.

Shut-Off Valve

A built-in shut-off valve can be pretty handy for helping you expand the hose more easily. This is a common feature that’s helpful for keeping the hose in good shape throughout a lot of expansions and retractions.

Warranty

Companies that truly stand behind their products can to reassure you that you’re getting something that’s going to last. And, if it doesn’t last, you can get a refund or replacement through the warranty program if it’s still valid.

Additional Pieces Included

Many expandable garden hoses come with a few extra add-ons to make the package more attractive. The most common add-ons are storage bags, spray nozzles, and hose hangers.

Conclusion

From the comparison table above, and based on the features I’ve mentioned, I would recommend the LawnPRO expandable garden hose. It’s the only one on our list that uses copper connectors, so it’s less likely burst under pressure and it can be used for drinking water if you want. It’s long enough for most home use at 50 ft., and it’s got a warranty for 12 months from the manufacturer. The only downside is it doesn’t come with a built-in shut-off valve.

Best Weed Puller Reviews

Garden weeding is not a job that many people enjoy, but it can be made easier if you have the right tools. Pulling weeds by hand is tiring and can really hurt your hands after a bit of time. Instead, look for the best weed puller to suit your garden and the types of weeds you’re pulling. A weed puller is going to help you do the job more quickly and with a lot less effort than hand weeding or even using a shovel.

Using a Weed Puller

Using a Weed Puller

A lot of gardeners use shovels of spades to do the job of pulling out tough weeds. This can work for some areas, but it tends to leave large holes around the yard that will then have to be covered up again. Not every area of the garden can handle having holes everywhere. Grass lawns, grow tents, and tight flower beds are bad places to use a spade for weeding. Using a weed puller will make the work faster and more efficient than weeding by hand.

Benefits of Weed Pullers

What can you expect the best weed puller to do for you if you buy it? Here are the benefits you will get if you make the right purchase:

Spare Your Hands

Hand pulling weeds, even if you are wearing gloves, is pretty rough business. Your hands can get torn up and cut by tough weeds like crab grass or thistles. Weed puller eliminate the need to use your hands for pulling tough weeds. Instead, you’ll just get the weed puller itself to do the dirty work for you!

Help Your Back

Not every type of weed puller is designed to take strain off your back, but many long-handled version are available that make it so you don’t have to bend over. No more breaking out the heavy backpack sprayer to get rid of weeds either. If you have any back problems, knee issues, or other physical health problems, a tall weed puller will make a bit difference for your health and comfort while you’re working in the garden.

Easily Remove Common Weeds

Some specialized tools are made to handle heavy-duty weeds, but for the common garden weeds found around North America a regular weed puller is a good option. Some are designed to pull our long-root weeds like Dandelions, while others go for a more complete set of weeds. Either way, a weed puller is going to be helpful for dealing with the unwanted weeds resulting from using fertilizer for grass.

Weed Puller Comparison Table

Image

Type of Weed Puller

Grip

Length

Materials

Weight

Weed Size

Our Rating


Vremi Garden Weeder

Hand twist and pull

Ergonomic rubber

12.5 in.

Cast aluminum

6.4 oz.

Small to medium

#1
Editor Choice


Radius Garden 205 PRO

Hand twist and pull

Ergonomic rubber

42.5 in.

Resin-encased steel shaft + steel blade

3.97 lb.

Medium to large

#2


CobraHead Weeder and Cultivator

Hand twist and pull

Ergonomic recycled plastics

13 in.

Temper steel blade

9.2 oz.

Small to medium

#3


Fiskars Deluxe Stand-up Weeder

Weed grabber

Offset ergonomic handle

39 in.

Stainless steel claw, aluminum shaft, plastic sheath

2 lb.

Small to medium

#4


The Original Lawn Jaws Sharktooth

Hand weed grabber

Hardened rubber

8.7 in.

Steel claws

5.6 oz.

Small to medium

#5

How to Choose the Best Weed Puller

What do you need to look for if you want to make sure you get the best weed puller? Here are the features and characteristics to keep an eye out for when you’re buying:

Type of Weed Puller

There are a lot of varieties of weed pullers. Some use a twisting and pulling method to remove weeds, others have claws that dig in and grab the weeds, and they can be all different heights. The type of weed puller you want to use depends entirely on your specific needs. If you like to get down and dirty pulling weeds, a hand weeder that uses the twist and pull method can be a great option for you.

However, if you want to avoid all the bending and kneeling down to reach the soil, a long shaft weed puller is going to be a great choice for you instead. These come in twist and pull or grabbing styles mostly, and they can be used without stooping over or bending at all.

Grip

A comfortable grip with an ergonomic handle shape is going to make your weed pulling job a bit more pleasant. It’s not really a deal-breaker to skip this part, but it’s something that a lot of people are going to want from a weed puller. Handles that are more comfortable will make it easier to pull weeds for hours at a time.

Length

Whether you want to kneel down and pull weeds or stand a pull, the length is going to make the difference. Some are designed to be tall and are used while you’re standing. Others will be just a few inches long, and should be used with you closer to the ground.

Length also determines how deep you can pull weeds from. If the type of weed you want to pull has a long root or grows deeply into the ground, a longer shaft is going to make it easier to handle those types of weeds.

Materials

Plastic weed pullers will likely not last as long as high-quality metal weed pullers. Pay attention to the blade material for twist and pull weeders, and the entire mechanism for weed grabbers. Grabbers need to be made from a stronger material in order to work effectively as long as you’re using them. This includes the foot pedal, ejection mechanism, handle, and blades, since they will all be interconnected.

Weight

Another feature that probably won’t be a deal-breaker, the weight of the weed puller only really matters if you’ll be using it for extended periods of time or if you are carrying it around a lot. In a normal weeding situation, the weight won’t have much effect on how you use the weeder.

Weed Size

Not every weeder is equipped to handle weeds of all types. Usually they can handle certain size ranges. No weed puller can do it all, so choose one that will do the most for your yard.

Conclusion

From our comparison table above, I want to recommend the Vremi Garden Weeder as the best weed puller. It’s a hand weed puller with a unique shape that makes it easy to yank out most small to medium weeds. The design is both comfortable and very sturdy, with a rubber ergonomic handle and cast aluminum blade and shaft. Overall, this is a good weeder for most gardeners to get rid of pesky weeds from the lawn and garden.

Best Chainsaw Chain for Hardwood Reviews

As you can imagine, not all chainsaws are created equal. Different chainsaws are suited to different jobs, so if you are looking to cut hardwood, you need a chainsaw that can effectively handle the job. But even once you find that perfect chainsaw, there is still more work to be done: you must find the best chainsaw chain for hardwood as well.

Chances are your chainsaw came with a chain, but it isn’t always the best chain for the job. For example, those who need professional chainsaws might need a better chain. And if you are cutting hardwood, you will need chains that can handle that. Even if your chainsaw chain is perfect now, it will need to be replaced eventually, either because it becomes damaged or because your chainsaw sharpener can no longer save it. To make the best choice, you need to find one that fits your chainsaw and is effective at cutting through tough or dried wood.

Applications for Chainsaws and Their Chains

For most chainsaw owners, it isn’t all that often that they use it. They purchase it for small jobs around the yard and only use it a few times a year. However, those who use their chainsaws with hardwood usually do so because it is part of their profession, or because they need to cut a lot of firewood for their home.

When it comes to professional use or firewood, you need to be sure you have a quality chain. If working with hardwood, you are looking for a chain that is very durable and offers a high gauge. This allows the teeth of the chain to tear through more wood at a time.

Who are some people that might need to purchase the best chainsaw chain for hardwood? There are those who have a need for firewood, those who have heavily wooded property they need to maintain, and various professions, such as loggers, construction workers, and even wood carvers. And even if you do not fall into any of these categories, if you want maximum flexibility with your chainsaw, a chain that can handle all woods including hardwood is best.

Do You Need Different Chains for Different Woods?

Chainsaw chain for kind of good

The answer to this is both yes and no. If you are going to be cutting hardwood, you need a chain that can specifically handle hardwood. Cut these chains can be used to cut softer woods as well. The primary issue in using a hardwood chain for softer woods is that you will not get as precise of a result as you would with a chain that offers a small gauge. For some uses, this matters a lot, but for most casual users, this will not pose a problem. So, if you are expecting to use your chainsaw on different types of wood but precision is not a big concern, the best chainsaw chain for hardwood could be your best chainsaw chain overall.

When to Replace a Chainsaw Chain for Hardwood

If you purchased your chainsaw and it came with a chain that is suited to hardwood, you can wait until it wears down or sustains damage. If you did not purchase a chainsaw with a chain that handles hardwood well, you will need to replace it before you use it on any hardwood. Assuming your chainsaw already has a good chain, you should look for signs of problems before and during each use.

The most common sign of a problem is that the chainsaw is not cutting as well as it used to. This usually can be fixed by sharpening the chain, but eventually even sharpening will not be able remedy this. Another common sign of trouble is that the chain or bar seems to bend when you are cutting.

Step number one is to have the chain sharpened. You can do this at home with a chainsaw chain sharpener or you can take it to a service center that offers this service. If this does not fix the issue, you should replace the chain, otherwise accidents are likely to happen. If teeth come off the chain, even if the other teeth are still working fine, you should still replace the chain. And, if you feel like the chain is reaching the point that it might break, stop using the chainsaw until the chain can be replaced.

Top 5 Chainsaw Chains for Hardwood Comparison Table

Product Name

Depth Gauge

Tooth Type

Tooth Arrangement

Our Rating

STIHL 33 RSF 72 Oilomatic Rapid Super Skip Tooth Chainsaw Chain 20"

.050

Full chisel

Full skip

#1
Editor Choice

Oregon 36" Chainsaw Chain

.063

Full chisel

Full skip

#2

uxcell 404Pitch 64 Drivers 063 Gauge Full Skip Chainsaw

.063

Semi chisel

Full skip

#3

OREGON 75CJ115G

.063

Semi chisel

Standard

#4

OREGON 75CJ105G

.063

Semi chisel

Standard

#5

How to Choose the Best Chainsaw Chain for Hardwood

When choosing the best chainsaw chain for hardwood, you need to look at many different features. To help you understand how various chainsaw features impact your using them with hardwood, take a look at them below. Please note, we are not looking at all possible features, only those that impact the effectiveness of a chain when using it on hardwood.

Tooth Material: Since the teeth function as blades that cut into the wood, you need a strong material. When it comes to cutting hardwood, the stronger the material, the better for you.

Tooth Type: The two most common types of chainsaw teeth are full-chisel and semi-chisel. Full-chisel teeth cut faster, but semi-chisel teeth will stay sharper longer. For the majority of people using their chainsaw with hardwood, semi-chisel teeth are best, since they can cut through tough woods without instantly dulling.

Depth Gauges: This refers to how deep the teeth can cut. When it comes to hardwood, deeper gauges are better, as they bite further into the wood. However, this can cause the teeth to sometimes become stuck, which results in kickback.

Tooth Arrangement: This refers to the ratio of teeth to drive links. Standard chains have a one-to-one ratio. Full skip chains have a ratio of two drive links to one tooth, and semi skip chains alternate between a one-to-one ration and the two-to-one ration of the full skip. If you need smooth results with hardwood, a standard chain is best, but for most hardwood applications, such as cutting firewood or logging, full skip and semi skip are better.

In addition to these features, which you must choose based on the type of wood you are cutting, there are other features you must match to your chainsaw. These features include the gauge, which is different from depth gauge, pitch, and length.

Conclusion

When selecting the best chainsaw chain for hardwood, you first need to make certain you select a chain that meets the specifications of your chainsaw, otherwise its use will not be safe, or will it be effective. Once you know those specifics, you can look for the depth gauge, tooth type, and tooth arrangement that is best for cutting hardwoods. Keep in mind that you will need different chains for rough cuts than for precise cuts, and buy the best chainsaw chain for hardwood accordingly.

Best Chainsaw Bar Reviews

For most of us, a chainsaw really isn’t an item you customize. You simply look for the chainsaw you like best, and once you find it, that is pretty much it. Sure, you will need to sharpen the chain from time to time, and replace it when needed, but beyond that, you just leave it alone, never thinking about if another option would be the best chainsaw bar.

But for those who use their chainsaw for professional purposes or who use it fairly frequently, it can be necessary to change things up a bit. And the place where customization is most common is with the chainsaw bar. To help you navigate this customization option for your chainsaw, we have assembled a list of the five best chainsaw bars on the market today.

What Are Chainsaws Good For?

For those who do not use their chainsaw for professional purposes, their chainsaw is mainly used to take care of simple tasks around the house. It might be used to trim trees, or to cut up branches that fall after a storm. For those with wood-burning fireplaces, it might be used to cut firewood. In general, those who are using chainsaws for non-professional purposes will not purchase a chainsaw bar for customization purposes, but they might need to replace theirs due to damage or wear and tear over time.

Those who use their chainsaws for professional purposes are much more likely to seek a chainsaw bar for customization purposes specific to their needs, opting for the best chainsaw bar for each job. And there are many professions that require the use of chainsaws, such as landscapers, wood artisans, and even firemen. Different aspects of their jobs can require different lengths of bars, so they might even keep several sizes on hand.

What Is a Chainsaw Bar?

Before you get into replacing or customizing your chainsaw bar, you should understand what it is. In essence, the chainsaw bar is the guide for the chainsaw chain. Your chain must fit perfectly against the bar for safety and effectiveness. The chain runs along the bar, rotating and cutting through the wood. The length of the bar also determines the balance of the chainsaw, how fast it cuts, and the diameter of the wood the chainsaw can handle.

Why Might You Change the Bar on Your Chainsaw?

The first reason to replace your chainsaw bar is that it is looking worse for wear or has been damaged. Damaged chainsaw bars are highly problematic. Beyond not being the best chainsaw bar to use, they are actually dangerous. For example, a bent bar does not provide a steady guide for the chain, and the chain can fly off, injuring you and others. Chips in the bar can also cause the same issues, and both chips and bent bars can damage chainsaw chains, resulting in your needing to replace both the bar and the chain.

However, not everyone who wants to replace their chainsaw bar does so because of problems with the bar. As noted above, professionals will often want to customize bar length to suit their needs. This can be because they are working in a small space and need a smaller bar, or they are cutting thick pieces of wood and need a longer bar. However, when choosing the best chainsaw bar for you, there are a few things you need to consider, which we will explain below.

Top 5 Chainsaw Bars Comparison Table

Product Name

Image

Length

Weight

Purpose

Our Rating

Oregon 105671 20-Inch Replacement Chain Saw Bar

Oregon 105671 20-Inch Replacement Chain Saw Bar and Chain Combo For Stihl

20 inches

3 pounds, including chain

Cutting large or thick logs.

#1
Editor Choice

Intenz Bar/Chain 16" S56

Intenz Bar/Chain 16" S56

16 inches

1.8 pounds, including chain

Multi-purpose, works with most types of wood.

#2

Oregon 540391 16-Inch Pro-Lite Bar

Oregon 540391 16-Inch Pro-Lite Bar and 22BPX

16 inches

1.9 pounds, including chain

Multi-purpose, works with most types of wood.

#3

ISE 18" Falcon Chainsaw Bar

ISE 18" Falcon Chainsaw Bar to Fit Stihl

18 inches

N/A

Cutting large and thick logs

#4

Poulan Pro 14" Guide Bar & Chain

Poulan Pro 14" Guide Bar & Chain BLUE Color Match

14 inches

1 pound, including chain

Cutting shorter and thinner pieces of wood, like branches

#5

How to Choose the Best Chainsaw Bar

Many chainsaw bar buying guides talk about things such as pitch and gauge when determining which chainsaw bar is right for you. However, these criteria actually describe the chainsaw chain, not the chainsaw bar, so they are not what you should be looking at when buying the best chainsaw bar for you. The goal should not be to fit the bar to the chain, but to fit the bar to the motor and the chain to the bar. Below are the criteria you should consider when buying a chainsaw bar.

Length

The length of your chainsaw bar determines how quickly it cuts and the diameter of the wood it can handle. Shorter bars cut faster, but longer bars can handle thicker pieces of wood. And while it might be tempting to select your chainsaw bar simply based on the reason you are using it, this can be a dangerous decision.

Why can this be a dangerous decision? Because the first thing you should consider when choosing a chainsaw bar is the power of the engine in your chainsaw. A low-powered engine with a long bar creates a very dangerous situation, and a very high-powered engine with a short bar can cause similar issues. With too little power for the bar, the chainsaw will struggle to work, making it harder to control. With too much power for the bar, it can cause the chainsaw to pull on you and take away your control, similar to the way placing a big engine in a tiny car would make it harder for the driver to control.

Your user manual for your chainsaw should specify which bar lengths are safe for your engine. However, if you do not have this manual, you still need to make a safe decision. A 30 cc to 45 cc engine can handle bars from 10 inches to 14 inches in length. 40 cc to 50 cc engines pair with 14-inch to 16-inch chain bars. 50 cc to 60 cc engines can handle 18 inch and 20 inch bars.

Weight

Another factor to consider is the weight. Longer bars change the balance of the chainsaw, and this can make it harder for you to handle the weight. Which weight is best for you depends less on the chainsaw and more on what you are comfortable with. The best chainsaw bar for you should be one you can handle easily without becoming fatigued.

Purpose

Finally, you should consider the purpose you will be using the chainsaw for. Thin pieces of wood can be cut with shorter bars, while thicker pieces of wood need longer bars. However, always defer to what is safe for the engine rather than what you think will best suit your purpose.

Conclusion

Whether you are replacing a damaged bar or trying to customize your chainsaw, it is important that you consider length, weight, and purpose when choosing which is the best chainsaw bar for you. However, the most important factor to consider is which length is best suited to the engine power of your chainsaw. Remember, the safest choice is the best choice.

Best Chainsaw for Firewood Reviews

What is the best way to spend a winter’s evening? For many, it is curled up in front of the fire. And while gas and electric fireplaces are plentiful, nothing quite beats the authenticity of a wood burning fireplace. And if you are going to make the most of owning such a fireplace, you need to purchase the best chainsaw for firewood.

For those unfamiliar with chainsaws, it might come as a shock that you need different types of chainsaws for different applications. However, if you are looking to get the best results, it is important. Let’s take a look at some things about chainsaws you need to understand as a buyer.

What Are Chainsaws Good For?

professional chainsaw man

Since we are talking about the best chainsaw for firewood, it is clear that this is one thing chainsaws are good for is cutting firewood, but this isn’t the only reason you should own one. In general, a chainsaw is a handy item to have around. Even if you do not have a fireplace, you can use a chainsaw designed to handle firewood for trimming back your trees, cutting up a fallen tree for easy removal, and even to cut wood scraps from DIY projects into smaller pieces for easy hauling.

What to Know About Owning a Chainsaw for Firewood

Chainsaws designed to cut firewood are meant to work quickly and efficiently while being easy on your body to handle. This means that they are generally lighter in weight than many other chainsaws and easier to control. However, they are not designed to make very precise cuts, as this is not a great concern when cutting firewood. If you are looking for a chainsaw that can handle other applications besides cutting firewood, it may be best to search for a chainsaw that is specific to those other needs and can also be used for cutting firewood.

Top 5 Chainsaws for Firewood Comparison Table

Product Name

Image

Weight

Power Source

Engine Power

Bar Length

Anti-Vibration Technology

Our Rating

DEWALT DCCS690H1

DEWALT DCCS690H1 40V 6AH Lithium Ion XR Brushless Chainsaw, 16"

20 pounds

40-volt battery

40 volts, equivalent to the 35cc to 45 cc range

16 inches

No

#1
Editor Choice

Echo CS-590 20" Timber Wolf Chainsaw

Echo CS-590 20" Timber Wolf Chainsaw

17 pounds

Gas

59.8cc

20 inches

Yes

#2

Sun Joe ION16CS 16-Inch 4-Amp 40-Volt Cordless Chain Saw

Sun Joe ION16CS 16-Inch 4-Amp 40-Volt Cordless Chain Saw

12.8 pounds

40-volt battery

40 volts, equivalent to the 35cc to 45 cc range

16 inches

No

#3

Husqvarna 460 Rancher 20-Inch

Husqvarna 460 Rancher 20-Inch 60.3cc 2-Stoke X-Torq Gas Powered Chain Saw (CARB Compliant)

12.79 pounds

Gas

60.3cc

20 inches

Yes

#4

Poulan P3314 14-Inch

Poulan P3314 14-Inch 33cc 2-Cycle Gas-Powered Chain Saw

16 pounds

Gas

33cc

14 inches

No

#5

How to Choose the Best Chainsaw for Firewood

Not all chainsaws are created equal, and when it comes to choosing the best chainsaw for firewood, you need to consider a variety of factors. The best chainsaw for one person won’t be the best option for another. Below are some things you should consider when selecting the option that is best for you.

Weight

Chainsaws are dangerous items, even those with plenty of safety features. Because of this, you need to make sure that the chainsaw you buy is one you can easily handle. One of the biggest factors in this will be the weight of the machine. You need to choose a chainsaw that you can hold, lift, and manipulate easily. And if you will be spending a lot of time using it, you need to consider how fatigued you will be come over time.

Power Source

Your power source affects several aspects of chainsaw use. The biggest is mobility. Gas and battery operated chainsaws allow you to work anywhere, but an electric chainsaw necessitates that you are tethered to a power source. Another consideration is weight. Batteries and gas tanks will add weight to the chainsaw, but electric models add no weight, making the chainsaw easier to handle. Another aspect impacted by power source is how easy the chainsaw is to start; gas-powered models sometimes resist starting, while battery-powered and electric-powered models turn on with the flip of a switch.

Engine Power

Chainsaw bar lenght

Cutting firewood is a tough job, and you need a chainsaw with the engine power to handle it. Of course, how much engine power you need will depend on the type and size of wood you are working with. Engine power is measured in cc, which stands for cubic centimeters.

A mistake many buyers make is selecting a chainsaw based on the length of the bar more so than the engine power it offers. It is important to understand that bat length can always be changed, but the power the engine offers remains fixed. However, it is best to purchase a chainsaw that offers both the engine power you need and the bar length you prefer. And keep in mind that the more powerful the chainsaw, the longer the bar in can handle.

So, how much power do you need? The factor to consider is the diameter of the wood you will be cutting. If you are cutting wood that is under 12 inches in diameter, 35cc to 45 cc will do. For wood in the range of 12 inches to 16 inches in diameter, opt for engine power in the range of 45cc to 55cc. For logs ranging between 16 inches and 22 inches in diameter, look for an engine with a minimum of 55cc and up to 70cc. And should you need to cut wood that is over 22 inches in diameter, look for an engine offering over 70cc. However, unless you have plenty of experience with chainsaws, it is best that you leave jobs that require such power to the professionals.

Bar Length

As noted above, bar length can be changed, so it is not the biggest factor to consider. However, it is important to note that you should make certain the bar length is appropriate for the power the engine offers; placing a long bar on an underpowered chainsaw is very dangerous. If you are inexperienced with chainsaws, it is best to purchase one with your preferred bar length from the start.

So, how do you determine the bar length you need? While the diameter of the wood you are cutting might impact this decision a bit, you really should base it on what you can comfortably handle. The longer the bar length, the more unbalanced the chainsaw and the harder it is to control. Another thing to consider is cutting speed. While a longer bar can handle a larger diameter with fewer passes, a smaller bar actually cuts faster. If you are uncertain about what you can handle or the speed you need, it is better to go for a shorter bar than a longer one.

Anti-Vibration Technology

Finally, you should consider whether or not you need anti-vibration technology. If you are not going to be cutting firewood regularly, the best chainsaw for firewood for you might not need this technology. But if you are planning to use it regularly or for long periods of time when you do use it, this technology is a must. This prevents the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome and also makes the chainsaw more comfortable to use overall.

Conclusion

If you are looking for the best chainsaw for firewood, there is no one-size-fits-all option. In order to make the best choice for you, you must consider the weight of the chainsaw, the power source it uses, the engine power it offers, the bar length, and the anti-vibration technology. However, we are confident that if you select any of our five choices above, you will be happy with your purchase.

Best Chainsaw Chain Reviews

Finding the right chainsaw for you can be difficult; there are so many factors to consider, and there isn’t one choice that is right for everyone. But even once you own your ideal chainsaw, there is still more work to do: you need to find the best chainsaw chain as well.

Yes, your chainsaw will come with one, but eventually, that chain will wear out and it will need to be replaced. When the time comes, you want to make sure that you purchase one that is effective, safe, and right for your chainsaw. To help you navigate this purchase, check out our buying guide below.

Applications of Chainsaws and Their Chains

Chainsaw chain

You might be wondering how likely it is that you will ever need to replace your chainsaw chain—or even buy a chainsaw in the first place. For most people, cutting up wood is not a part of their daily activities. But many of us will need a quality chainsaw—and quality chainsaw chain—from time to time. What are some common applications?

First, there are those who use chainsaws professionally. They work in construction, landscaping, or the like and need to cut wood for a variety of reasons. Then there are those with trees in their yards or expansive wooded property; a chainsaw can be used to trim back trees and eliminate the dangers poses by falling branches. And if you have a wood burning fireplace, you will likely have a need to cut wood, either by cutting down trees to obtain it or by reducing the size of logs you purchase so they are manageable. Other reasons to keep a chainsaw handy are for DIY construction and furniture projects, cutting other objects to size, such as hay bales, and even ice cutting and carving.

When to Replace a Chainsaw Chain

Sometimes the chain your chainsaw comes with just isn’t the best chainsaw chain. In this case, you might want to replace it immediately. But in most cases, it will take some time for the chain to wear down to the point that you want to replace it. If you notice that the chainsaw is not cutting as well as it used to, or as well as you would like, this indicates that the chain is no longer functioning optimally. Another indication of a problem is that it seems to bend when used.

Now, you do not need to immediately replace a chain that is showing signs of a problem. The first step is to sharpen it; you can do this yourself or head to a service center for them to do this for you. Once your chain reaches the point that it displays problems even after sharpening, it is time to replace it. Also, if teeth come off, it is best to go ahead and replace the chain. Finally, should you see any signs that the chain might be ready to snap, stop using it immediately and replace the chain.

The Importance of Using the Best Chainsaw Chain

The chainsaw chain is the mechanism that actually cuts the wood. It is composed of a series of teeth, and these teeth move at a high rate of speed, biting into the wood and pulling on it, effectively cutting it. While a quality chainsaw chain is more effective at cutting and can manage to complete a job faster, this is not the main reason you should seek out the best chainsaw chain for your tool. Instead, safety is the reason you shouldn’t settle for less than the best.

When a chainsaw chain fails to operate correctly, it poses many safety issues. It can break, causing it to fly off the tool and injure you or another. It can slip off the bar and cut you as you work. It can even bite too deep into the wood, getting stuck and then causing kickback that can injure you, or even cause the wood you are cutting to became dangerous debris. As such, it is vital that you seek out the best chain, not just the best deal.

Top 5 Chainsaw Chains Comparison Table

While we have selected the following five chainsaw chains as the best, you should not strictly purchase from our list; it is much more important that you purchase the chain that best fits your chainsaw. Make certain you know exactly what your chainsaw needs before you buy. If you do not see an option here that is safe for your chainsaw, look for an option from the same manufacturers to ensure both safety and quality.

Product Name

Image

Gauge

Pitch

Length

Our Rating

Husqvarna 531300439

Husqvarna 531300439 18-Inch H30-72 (95VP) Pixel Saw Chain, .325-Inch by .050-Inch

.050 Inch Gauge

.325 Inch Pitch

18 Inch Length

#1
Editor Choice

Husqvarna 531300441

Husqvarna 531300441 20-Inch H80-72 (72V) Saw Chain, 3/8-Inch by .050-Inch

.050 Inch Gauge

3/8ths Inch Pitch

20 Inch Length

#2

Oregon S62 18-Inch

Oregon S62 18-Inch Semi Chisel Chain Saw Chain Fits Craftsman, Homelite, Poulan

.050 Inch Gauge

3/8ths Inch Pitch

18 Inch Length

#3

Oregon 14-Inch

Oregon 14-Inch Chain Saw Chain Fits Craftsman, Echo, Homelite, Poulan, S52

.050 Inch Gauge

3/8ths Inch Pitch

14 Inch Length

#4

Oregon S56 16-Inch

Oregon S56 16-Inch Semi Chisel Chain Saw Chain Fits Craftsman, Echo, Homelite, Poulan, Remington

.050 Inch Gauge

3/8ths Inch Pitch

16 Inch Length

#5

How to Choose the Best Chainsaw Chain

The key to purchasing the best chainsaw chain for your chainsaw is knowing what your chainsaw needs. While it is possible to determine this on your own using various measurements, there is too much room for error, and when it comes to your safety, that is unacceptable. Your best course of action is to consult the user manual for your chainsaw. If you no longer have this, find the serial number for your chainsaw and call the manufacturer to get the specifics.

You might be wondering how a chain could be this complicated. Well, saw chains have many parts. Below are explanations of these parts and the roles they play.

Choose the Best Chainsaw Chain

Depth Gauges

This part of the chain determines how deep the teeth will cut. Shallow cuts mean that the job will take longer; deep cuts run the risk of getting stuck, resulting in kickback and possible debris. The depth gauge you choose is a matter of personal preference.

Tooth Material

The teeth are what bites into the wood, pulling on it and cutting it. The stronger the material of the teeth, the better the chain. Most chainsaw chain teeth are made from chromium-plated alloy. Nearly all chainsaw chains will alternate between left-facing and right-facing teeth, allowing the chain to cut on both sides.

Tooth Type

There are two primary types of chainsaw teeth: full-chisel teeth and semi-chisel teeth. Full-chisel teeth have sharply angled square corners. These teeth can be sharpened easily and are able to split wood rapidly. Semi-chisel teeth feature rounded corners. This means they do not cut as quickly, but the advantage of this type of teeth is that it takes a long time to dull, even when used on hardwood, dry wood, or frozen wood. Your choice regarding tooth type is a matter of personal preference.

Tooth Arrangement

This refers to the balance between the teeth and the drive links that connect the teeth to each other, completing the chain. Standard chains, which are also called full complement and full house chains, offer a one-to-one ratio of tooth to drive link, placing a link between each set of teeth. Full skip chains place two drive links between each set of teeth, and semi-skip chains alternate between the standard one-to-one ratio and the full skip one-to-two ratio. Standard chains thus offer the most teeth, which results in the most efficient results. As such, it is the best tooth arrangement for most applications. Your choice regarding tooth arrangement is a matter of personal preference.

Gauge

We noted the depth gauges above, but this is different. This refers to the thickness of the drive links, which are usually within the range of .05 inches to .063 inches. It is vital that you match this to the gauge of the chainsaw guide bar; this must be an exact match.

Pitch

The pitch refers to the average distance between any two rivets on the chain. However, this distance tends to vary. In order to calculate the pitch, measure the distance between three rivets, then divide that result by two. Common pitches are .325, .375, and .404. It is vital that this is an exact match.

Length

The length of a chain is found by adding up the number of drive lengths. It is vital that it is the correct length, otherwise the chainsaw will be dangerous to operate.

Conclusion

When it comes to selecting the best chainsaw chain for your tool, the most important thing you can do is make sure that you are opting for the correct gauge, pitch, and length for your chainsaw. While we have compiled a list of the five we think are best, it is more important that you seek a chain that has the right options for your power tool. If you are uncertain about what your chainsaw needs, consult the user manual or contact the manufacturer.

Best Professional Chainsaw Reviews

For most people, a chainsaw is just another tool in the shed. You have it because you need it from time to time, but you don’t use it all that often. Maybe you trim back branches on the trees in the yard, or just keep it around to deal with branches that fall after storms. But ultimately, you don’t give it too much thought or seek out the best professional chainsaw when purchasing one.

For those who use chainsaws as part of their profession, or even just on a frequent basis, it is a very different story. For these individuals, the very best is needed. In addition to seeking out high-quality chainsaws, they need those that meet their specifications, which usually means more power than your average chainsaw and possibly a longer bar length. To help, we have compiled a list of the best professional chainsaws currently on the market.

Professions That Use Chainsaws

Professional chainsaws might seem like something very few people need. After all, it isn’t like lumberjack is a growing profession. In truth, there are many different jobs where chainsaws are handy, or even vital to getting the job done. What are some of these professions?

professional chainsaw man

Firefighters use chainsaws to ventilate burning buildings and create access points where those built into the house have been cut off. Construction crews and remodeling teams use them when creating and altering buildings, making rough cuts before going in with more precise tools. Demolition teams use them to cut through various wood items, from walls to fences to furniture. Landscapers use them to trim back branches. Property management companies use them to remove fallen trees after storms. Even farmers use them to cut items like hay bales into more manageable sizes.

And even if you do not fall into these categories, you still might need a professional grade chainsaw. If you have a wood-burning fireplace or a wood-burning stove, a chainsaw is more manageable than an axe or a log splitter and can help you with your daily chores. If you have a heavily wooded property, a professional-grade chainsaw makes it easy for you need keep the trees trimmed and safe, and allows you to cut them down should you notice they are starting to rot. Ultimately, there are many reasons to seek out the best professional chainsaw on the market.

Top 5 Professional Chainsaws Comparison Table

Product Name

Image

Weight

Power Source

Engine Power

Bar Length

Anti-Vibration Technology

Our Rating

Husqvarna 966048324 460 24-Inch 60cc Rancher Chain Saw

Husqvarna 966048324 460 24-Inch 60cc Rancher Chain Saw

Gas

60cc

External

24 inches

Yes

#1
Editor Choice

Husqvarna 460 Rancher 20-Inch 60.3cc 2-Stoke X-Torq Gas Powered Chain Saw

Husqvarna 460 Rancher 20-Inch 60.3cc 2-Stoke X-Torq Gas Powered Chain Saw

Gas

60.3cc

Submersible

20 inches

Yes

#2

CS-500P-20 Echo Chain Saw, Gas, 20 In. Bar, 50.2cc

CS-500P-20 Echo Chain Saw, Gas, 20 In. Bar, 50.2cc

Gas

50cc

External

20 inches

Yes

#3

Poulan Pro PP5020AV 20-Inch 50cc 2 Stroke Gas Powered Chain Saw

Poulan Pro PP5020AV 20-Inch 50cc 2 Stroke Gas Powered Chain Saw

Gas

50.2cc

External

20 inches

Yes

#4

Poulan Pro 967185102 PP4218A 42cc Assembled Chainsaw

Poulan Pro 967185102 PP4218A 42cc Assembled Chainsaw

Gas

42cc

External

18 inches

Yes

#5

How to Choose the Best Professional Chainsaw

As with any product, not every chainsaw marketed as being professional-grade will be a good investment. In addition to seeking out brands with quality reputations, you also need to think about the features each model offers and if they are right for you. Below are the primary features to consider

Weight

With a professional-grade chainsaw, you are generally looking at more power and a bigger bar length, which ultimately equals more weight. However, you do not want to just accept that your chainsaw will be heavy and tell yourself to deal with it. Since you will be using it frequently and over extended periods of time, a manageable weight is critical to comfortable and safe use.

Power Source

In general, mobility is a major concern for those using chainsaws for professional applications. Because of this, electric powered chainsaws are not the best for most professional applications. Gas and battery power are both possibilities, but battery-powered chainsaws tend to have lower engine power. The trade-off with selecting a battery-powered model is that it will weigh less than a gas-powered model with a full tank.

Engine Power

When using a chainsaw for professional purposes, power is key. Not only does it allow you to cut through larger pieces of wood, but it does it faster than a lower-powered chainsaw would. And, as they say, time is money. Engine power is measured in cc, which stands for cubic centimeters.

When deciding on which chainsaw to buy, it is important that you prioritize the engine power over the bar length. While bar length may matter a lot, depending on the job you do, it is also something that can be changed when needed. The engine power, however, will remain fixed. If possible, purchase a chainsaw that offers both the power you need and the length you need. If not, purchase for power and modify the bar length. And also remember that more powerful engines can handle longer bars.

How much power do you need in the best professional chainsaw for you? That depends on the wood you are working with. If, for example, you are simply trimming branches, 35cc to 45cc will be fine. But if you are cutting through thick logs, cutting down trees, or tackling other heavy-duty jobs, you need engines that offer 55cc and up. Anything over 22 inches in diameter will require greater than 70cc.

Bar Length

Chainsaw bar lenght

We already noted that bar length can be changed, so this should not be your deciding factor unless all else is equal. However, you want to make sure that if you are planning on changing the bar length, it is appropriate for the amount of power the engine offers. Engines with less power cannot handle long bar lengths, and adding a long bar to them makes the chainsaw dangerous to operate. The best-case scenario is to purchase a chainsaw that has the bar length you need.

So, what determines which bar length is best for you? The diameter of the wood you are cutting is one factor, but more than the wood you are cutting, you should decide based on what you can comfortably handle. Longer bar lengths impact the balance of the machine, and this makes it harder to control the longer the bar.

Another thing to consider is that longer bars, while taking fewer passes, actually take longer to cut than short bar lengths. So if speed is a big factor in your work, you may want to stick with shorter bar lengths.

Anti-Vibration Technology

Finally, for professional applications, anti-vibration technology is a must. With regular use, chainsaws can cause something called hand-arm vibration syndrome, which is an uncomfortable condition that makes your limbs feel as though they are constantly vibrating, even when you have not used the chainsaw for many hours. In addition to being uncomfortable, this can cause trouble when it comes to having full sensation in your arms and hands, which is in itself a safety issue.

Conclusion

If you are looking for the best professional chainsaw, there are plenty of good options on the market, and we worked hard to select the five best for you. But before you buy, really consider how the weight, power source, engine power, bar length, and antivibration technology impact the way you work. We are confident that one of our five choices above will work well for you.

Best Chainsaw Sharpener Reviews

Have you ever tried to cut a piece of paper with a dull pair of scissors? Or have you ever tried to slice a tomato with a dull knife? If you have, you understand the problems that can come about when using a dull chainsaw chain and why you need the best chainsaw sharpener on the market.

Or at least some of them. In addition to just not doing a good job, a dull chain can pose other problems. Since it makes the chainsaw work harder, it can cause the assembly to become overheated. With repeated use, it can actually burn out the motor. Then there are the potential safety hazards that can come about. A dull chain makes the chainsaw more likely to cause kickbacks that can knock you off your feet, and the rough cuts it makes can cause debris to fly about dangerously.

Because of the problems a dull chain poses, you need to sharpen your chainsaw chain regularly. We have compiled a list of the 5 best chainsaw sharpeners on the market for you.

Maintaining Your Chainsaw

In order to maintain your chainsaw, you should follow the directions provided in the user manual. This should cover everything from how to store the chainsaw to how much oil to use. The one aspect that usually isn’t so clear in these guides is sharpening the chain. This is for a few reasons, not the least of which is that if you don’t sharpen your chain, you will end up replacing it more often. Chainsaw manuals that do cover chain sharpening usually only look at manual sharpeners, which are so time consuming, you would most likely prefer to go ahead and buy a new chain.

Chainsaw chains become dull for many reasons, such as debris and dirt, but the primary reason is simply standard use. The more you cut with it, the more damage the blades will sustain. Sometimes the blades can be damaged due to encountering something unexpected in the wood you cut. But whatever the reasons the chain becomes dulled, the signs you look for are the same.

  • The chain doesn’t want to self-feed, leaving you to push on the saw to make it work.
  • The wood chips produced when cutting are too fine and dust-like.
  • The edges of the teeth appear shiny.
  • You notice that jobs are taking longer to complete or are more difficult to complete.

Because a dull chain puts your safety and the quality of your job at risk, you want to sharpen the chain as soon as you notice a problem.

Benefits of Owning a Chainsaw Sharpener

Perhaps the biggest benefit to owning a chainsaw sharpener is that it saves you money. Quality chains cost $14 or more, and if you replaced chains every time they got dull, you would be throwing away money. And if you use your chainsaw with any frequency, that is a lot of money.

For those who use their chainsaw as part of their job, this means lost profits. Even after just an hour or two of continuous use, a chainsaw chain can become dull. Few people have the room in their budget to spend an extra $14 a day just to replace chains. And since it keeps the chainsaw working optimally, a chainsaw sharpener also helps to guarantee best results.

While manual chainsaw sharpeners used to be the only options on the market, electric models now make sharpening chainsaw chains easier than ever. Most of these sharpeners are guided, which takes the guess work out of the equation and ensures that you can never make an angle mistake. All you need to do is select the right file or filer setting for the chain you are using. Compared to manual sharpening, this is a breeze. Manual sharpening is slow, and you must be careful to sharpen at the correct angle while also ensuring all teeth on the chain are sharpened equally. Powered chainsaw sharpeners take care of all of this for you.

Top 5 Best Chainsaw Sharpeners Comparison Table

Product Name

Image

Portability

Complexity

Pitches

Special Features

Our Rating

Oregon 410-120 Bench or Wall Mounted Saw Chain Grinder

Oregon 410-120 Bench or Wall Mounted Saw Chain Grinder

Not portable; must be mounted.

Medium complexity to operate

Sharpens 1/4 In , 3/8 In low profile, 0.325 In, full profile 3/8 In, and .404 In pitch chains

Built-in light

#1
Editor Choice

Oregon 511AX Saw Chain Bench Grinder/Sharpener

Oregon 511AX Saw Chain Bench Grinder/Sharpener

Not portable; must be mounted.

Medium complexity to operate

Sharpens 1/4-Inch, .325-Inch, 3/8-Inch, 1/2-Inch, and 3/4-Inch pitch chains

Built-in light

#2

Grizzly T23108 Chain Saw Sharpener

Grizzly T23108 Chain Saw Sharpener

Not portable; must be mounted.

Easy to operate

N/A

N/A

#3

Oregon 520-120 Bench Saw Chain Grinder

Oregon 520-120 Bench Saw Chain Grinder

Not portable; must be mounted

Medium complexity to operate

Sharpens 1/4", 3/8" low profile, 0.325", full profile 3/8", and .404" pitch chain

Built-in light

#4

Timberline Chainsaw Sharpener with 3/16" Carbide Cutter

Timberline Chainsaw Sharpener with 3/16" Carbide Cutter

Highly portable; can fit into a pocket.

Easy to operate

Sharpens .325" pitch chains

Comes with carrying case

#5

How to Choose the Best Chainsaw Sharpener

Overall, the best chainsaw sharpener for you is a matter of personal preference. The one you pick will mostly depend on how portable you want it to be, how easy it needs to be to use, and what special features you want. The only thing you need to look into that is not just a matter of personal preference are the pitches the sharpener can handle; this determines which chains it can sharpen. There are three basic types of sharpeners.

Handheld Round File

When referring to manual sharpening, this is the type of sharpener we are referring to. It is a round tool with a diameter small enough to allow it to fit between the teeth of the chain so it can shave off material and sharpen the teeth. You must make certain that you have the right diameter for the chain, otherwise you will do damage to the teeth rather than improving them.

Bar Mounted Guide

This is not so much a sharpener as it is a guide that accommodates a file. This guide fixes to the bar of the chainsaw and then helps guide the file through the teeth, sharpening them in the process. The results are very accurate, but this method is considered to be a bit dangerous, so it is not for casual users.

Electric Sharpener

For most people, this is the ideal type of sharpener, and as such, we mostly focused our top 5 picks on this type. This type of sharpener her powerful, versatile, safe, and efficient to use. Most are designed to work with a variety of pitches, making it easy for you to sharpen whatever chains you have at home. Without any effort on your part, a 20-inch chain can be sharpened in about five minutes. In terms of variety within electric sharpeners, it mainly comes down to how they mount and how complex they are to operate.

Conclusion

If you own a chainsaw and use it with any regularity, you also need to own a chainsaw sharpener. For most individuals, an electric option will be the best chainsaw sharpener for them. Out of our list of the 5 best chainsaw sharpeners on the market today, most of them electric models, we are confident that you will find the option that is best suited to you and your chainsaw.

Best Watering Wand Reviews

Caring for a garden can be a lot of fun, but it does take work and effort on your part to make it into something great. One thing you have to be very vigilant about is watering your plants. Without water, they won’t last long, and will never grow to their full potential. Having the best watering wand will help you keep up a good routine with minimal effort.

What is a Watering Wand?

Watering wands are hose attachments that are specially designed to spray water in a certain way. Some are used for washing cars or shooting out strong jets of water, while others are made for gentle watering of plants and gardens. They usually have a long reach and a mechanism for keeping the water flow on and turning it off again.

Watering wands can’t be used with hose end sprayers or other hose attachments, because they will be attached to the end of the garden hose themselves. If you already use this type of equipment, a watering wand will replace these pieces and can’t be used alongside them.

Why Are They Useful?

If you have tall hanging flower baskets, a watering wand is going to help you reach them easily without struggling or standing on top of anything. These wands also can change the spray pattern of the water to make it gentler on plants, while still soaking the area well. You can then switch to a stronger jet stream for washing cars or a medium stream for outside window washing. Their versatility makes watering wands a great tool to keep nearby your garden hose reel.

Benefits of a Watering Wand

Easily Reach Every Plant

Hanging plants are often hard to water properly, but a watering wand makes it really easy. Even your plants in the back of the garden that are hard to reach will be easier to water with a long wand.

Water Lightly

The best way to water plants is to sprinkle water softly, mimicking the rain. For this, you need a specialized hose attachment that softens the spray. Watering wands do just that, and they keep your plants safe from strong jets of water that might come from a normal hose. This way, you can water your plants just like it’s raining on them, and give them a good soaking.

Easier on Your Hands

Most watering wands have a simple on and off mechanism that gives you greater control over the stream without causing any more difficulty for your hand muscles. Some hose attachments take a lot of effort to keep a continuous stream, while others don’t give you options for varying the stream. Watering wands are more comfortable to use and usually give you some level of control over the water stream coming out.

Top 5 Watering Wand Reviews Comparison Table

Product Name

Image

Spray Pattern

Watering Strength

Reach

On/Off Mechanism

Our Rating

The Relaxed Gardener Watering Wand

The Relaxed Gardener Watering Wand

8 adjustable settings

Gentle to Strong

15 inches

Yes

#1
Editor Choice

Dramm 14804 One Touch Rain Wand

Dramm 14804 One Touch Rain Wand with One Touch Valve, 30-Inch, Green

Water Breaker shower head

Gentle

16 or 30 inches

No

#3

Orbit Hose-End 58674N

Orbit Hose-End 58674N 36-Inch 9-Pattern Turret Wand with Ratcheting Head

9 adjustable patterns

Gentle to Strong

36 inches

No

#4

Orbit Underground 56287

Orbit Underground 56287 Green Thumb Water Wand, 16-Inch

10 adjustable patterns

Gentle to Strong

16 inches

Partial

#2

Dramm 12900 Touch-N-Flow

Dramm 12900 Touch-N-Flow Hanging Basket Rain Wand 36-Inch Length, Blue

Rain Shower Head

Gentle

16, 30, or 36 inches

Partial

#5

How to Choose the Best Watering Wand

Here are the main characteristics to look for when you’re searching around for the best watering wand:

Spray Pattern

If you’re planning to use the wand for watering plants, you have to make sure there’s a good spray pattern available that mimics rain in some way. It should break up water droplets into smaller pieces that won’t hit the plants hard. A jet stream of water can harm your plants while you’re watering, and it won’t cover a large enough area at once. An ideal spray pattern has smaller droplets, but also sprays the water over a larger area at once.

Many watering wands come with adjustable spray patterns. It’s good to have options, in case you want to do a variety of things with the hose. Some watering wands only come with one spray head option, because they are designed for watering the garden plants and nothing else.

Watering Strength

As I’ve touched on already, the watering strength is one of the biggest things you need to look at when you’re choosing a watering wands. You need to find something that’s capable of gentle watering if you want to do work around the garden. Gentle watering shouldn’t cause any stress on the plants. It also shouldn’t cause the amount of water coming from the hose to lessen.

Ideally, a gentle and a strong spray should produce the same amount of water, but it will be distributed differently to increase or decrease the pressure. This makes it easier to water the garden in a short amount of time, since the stream of water is still heavy enough to soak into the ground well.

Reach

The reach of the watering wand refers to how long it is. A longer reach will help you to get to plants that are farther away without as much effort on your part. Hanging plants require a longer reach if they’re higher up on your deck or porch. Some garden layouts require a long reach to get to plants in the back and middle of the garden, because they are not close enough to the edges to be reached by a normal hose. The longer the reach, the easier it will be to water all of your plants at once.

On/Off Mechanism

Unless you want to make your hands sore from holding a trigger lever while watering, it’s a good idea to look for a wand with a mechanism that holds itself on or off at the level you set. Some wands still come with trigger levers, which are fine for most people, but bad for those with larger spaces to water or anyone who suffers from arthritis.

Instead of trigger levers, a lot of watering wands now have thumb operated on and off switches. You can push the tab to the level of water you want, allowing you to adjust the flow rate while you’re at it. If you push the thumb switch all the way, it will stay on and keep a steady stream of water going until you turn it off manually. Gardeners usually like this type better, since you won’t have to hold down a lever while watering all of your plants.

Conclusion

Now that you know how to look for the best watering wand, let me recommend the Relaxed Gardener Water Wand as a great choice to check out. It’s got adjustable spray patterns, gives you the choice of gentle or strong watering, works with thumb operated controls, and it has a decent reach of 16 inches. All of this makes it an ideal pick for gardening, although it’s not going to be as useful for washing cars or other applications.

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