Best Leaf Shredder Reviews

Leaves can be difficult to deal with. In autumn, once all of the leaves have fallen, raking and bagging leaves can take a long time and a lot of space. It’s difficult to get all the leaves into a reasonable number of bags, especially if you have a lot of trees in your yard. This is where the best leaf shredder can help you. Grinding leaves into a smaller size means more can fit in each bag, making it easier to get the work done once and for all.

What Does a Leaf Shredder Do?

Leaf shredders have a grinding mechanism that will pulverize leaves and some small twigs as they’re dropped through. You feed the leaves from the top where they will be chopped up and dropped below into a bag, container, or just onto the ground.

Benefits of Getting a Good Leaf Shredder

What good does a leaf shredder actually do for you? Here are some of the benefits you’ll get from a shredder:

Fantastic Compost Sourcing

Leaves make a great addition to your compost pile, but they can take a long time to decompose when put in whole. Using a leaf shredder, you can chop leaves up into small pieces that will decompose very quickly in the compost. Instead of waiting for 3 – 6 months for the leaves to compost, you’ll have them ready in 1 – 2 months.

Using Leaf Shredder

Reduce Your Leaf Bags

Normally, leaves are difficult to force into a bag. There’s too much air between the whole leaves, so you can’t actually fill them up. When you grind up your leaves, you’ll get more than 8 times as many leaves in each bag, cutting down the number of bags you need significantly. It can be a slower process, but it’s worth it if you want to reduce your bags and make it easier to get rid of leaves. Come it with a great chainsaw and you’ll reduce all your yard waste down to small, easy to manage chunks instead of large piles!

Make Homemade Mulch

Ground up leaves aren’t just useful for compost; they’re also great for mulching. Since many leaf shredders are also able to grind up small twigs, you can make excellent mulch for your garden with leaves and twigs. They will be chopped up into small pieces that will evenly cover the garden with healthy, organic materials. This is also nice if you have an outdoor fish pond. Things like Koi fish pond filters will easily clog from wood mulch, but can handle most leaf pieces.

Top 5 Leaf Shredder Reviews Comparison Table

Product Name

Image

Debris Size Capacity

Cutting Blade Type

Power Source

Portability

Attachable Bags?

Our Rating

WORX Leaf Mulcher WG430

WORX Leaf Mulcher WG430

Leaves and small twigs

Cutting line

Electric, 13 Amps

Less than 20 lbs., breaks down for storage

Yes, sold separately

#1
Editor Choice

Flowtron LE-900 The Ultimate Mulcher

Flowtron LE-900 The Ultimate Mulcher

Leaves and small twigs

Cutting line + shaped blades

Electric, 5.9 Amps

17 lbs., carrying handles, foldaway storage

Yes, sold separately

#2

Sun Joe SDJ616 Shredder

Sun Joe SDJ616 Shredder

Leaves and small twigs

Cutting line

Electric, 13 Amps

13.4 lbs, compact storage

Yes, sold separately

#3

LawnMaster FD1501

LawnMaster FD1501

Leaves, branches up to 1 & ½ in.

Blades

Electric, 15 Amps

8 In. wheels, 25.4 lbs.

25.5” x 17.63” x 27.13” inches

#4

Sun Joe CJ601E

Sun Joe CJ601E

Leaves, branches up to 1 & ½ in.

Blades

Electric, 14 Amps

6 In. wheels,

Yes, sold separately

#5

How to Choose the Best Leaf Shredder

You need to look closely at the features of each machine before you make a purchase. What makes the best leaf shredder instead of a mediocre one? Here are some of the things to look at:

Debris Size

Different types of leaf shredders exist. Some are made exclusively for leaves and small twigs, while some also act as chipper shredders for branches as well. If you just want to grind leaves, getting a full chipper shredder will be a waste of money, and the grinding mechanism won’t be as effective for leaves. However, if you have multiple uses for your machine, a leaf shredder/chipper shredder combination might be a great choice for you.

Cutting Blade Type

Leaf shredders can use different mechanisms to grind up the leaves you drop into the feeder. Some use cutting line, similar to the line used in weed eaters. Others use actual metal blades that spin around and chop up leaves and other small materials. The large chipper shredder machines sometimes have bigger metal blades with sharper edges.

For leaves only, cutting line is a cheap and useful solution for chopping. You don’t need a lot of strength or power to cut up a bunch of leaves. Cutting line does a fine job and is very cheap to replace when it’s running low.

Power Source

Most leaf shredders today are electric, but the more powerful units are sometimes gas-powered instead. If you have a large yard with a lot of stuff to chop, a gas-powered machine might be useful. However, these are usually more expensive, heavier, and less portable.

Electric leaf shredders make up the majority of the best leaf shredder machines for the average homeowner. Those working commercially might look for gasoline machines, but most homeowners won’t need anything more powerful than an electric machine.

Portability

When you want to get your leaf shredder out and use it in the yard, it’s useful to be able to do that easily. A machine that’s lighter weight, has wheels, or can collapse for storage easily is an asset for the average person. Storage is especially important, since you don’t need a leaf shredder throughout most of the year and will use it most frequently in a period of a few months. If you’re getting a smaller machine, wheels or other features won’t be as necessary. But, larger machine can be quite heavy and may be difficult to move without wheels or some other feature.

Attachable Bags?

If you’re planning to bag up your leaves, being able to attach a bag to the bottom of the leaf shredder will be a big plus for you. That way, you won’t have to scoop up the small leaf pieces, and you can simply have them fall into the bag once they’re ground up. Some leaf shredders come with large bags that you can use to catch debris and spread it around for mulch, but others allow you to attach your own disposable bags to the bottom for catching pieces.

Conclusion

From the leaf shredders I’ve mentioned in the comparison table above, I would recommend the WORX Leaf Mulcher WG430 as best leaf shredder. It’s got a 13 Amp engine that’s powerful enough to spin the cutting line and chop leaves down to 1/11th of their normal size. It also breaks down easily for storage, so during the off-seasons you don’t have to have it taking up too much space in the garage or shed.

Best Expandable Hose Reviews

Garden hoses are something that every homeowner should have, whether it’s for washing the car, watering gardens, cleaning up outside, or anything else that needs water. But, hoses can be very frustrating, because they constantly tangle up and they are difficult to manoeuver around the yard when you need them. If you’ve ever yanked around a full garden hose, you know what I mean! Many people are turning to look for the best expandable hose as a possible solution to the frustration.

Using Expandable Hose

What is an Expandable Hose?

Expandable hoses consist of two layers of materials. They have and inner tube materials inside and a stretchable fabric material on the outside. When filled with water, the hose can get up to three times its dry length. That means that when the hose is dry, it’s flexible, small, and very convenient, but when it’s full of water it gets to be the size of a regular garden hose.

They’re not a perfect solution, because the technology isn’t that old and it hasn’t been perfected yet. Most complaints come from the materials that are used to make the hoses, since they are softer than a normal rubber hose. Leaks and tears can become more common with expandable hoses, if you’re not careful about which one you buy.

Expandable hoses are compatible with watering wands, sprinklers, spray nozzles, spigots, and everything else that a normal garden hose would attach to. They come with connectors of standard sizing.

Benefits of Expandable Hoses

When you buy the best expandable hose, you’re going to have a better experience than if you buy a cheap, low-quality version. Here are the benefits you’ll get from a good one:

No kinks or tangles

Even if you wrap it up and store it on the ground, or pull it around after you, it won’t get kinks and messy tangles the same way that a traditional garden hose does. That’s not to say that can’t get tied up at all, but it’s less common and won’t be as bad of a knot.

Lightweight

Since the materials are expandable and softer, you won’t have to use as much muscle to pick up or drag around and expandable hose. They’re not as heavy and cumbersome as traditional hoses, make them a great choice for people with a little less arm strength.

Less space needed for storage

Expandable hoses are significantly smaller when they’re not full of water than when you’re using them. This makes it really easy to store them, although you won’t be able to use a hose reel, because the expanding hose would destroy itself if it wasn’t fully unwound before use. In any case, you won’t really need a hose reel, since these hoses take up so little space and can be easily put away, because they’re flexible.

Self-draining once the water is off

It’s easy to winterize or drain an expandable hose, since most of them do it automatically once you turn the water off. The motion of the hose returning to its smaller size will squeeze the water out and make the hose dry again inside.

Top 5 Expandable Hose Reviews Comparison Table

Product Name

Image

Length

Hose Materials

Connector Materials

Shut-Off Valve

Additional Pieces Included

Warranty

Our Rating

LawnPRO Expanding Garden Hose

LawnPRO Expanding Garden Hose

50 ft. EXPANDED

5,000 Denier woven fabric

Copper + Steel

No

Storage bag

12 months

#1
Editor Choice

Gardenirvana Expandable Hose

Gardenirvana Expandable Hose

50 ft. EXPANDED

Triple Latex core

Brass

Yes

Hanger, spray nozzle, splitter, and storage bag

12 months

#2

Ohuhu Super Strong Garden Hose

Ohuhu Super Strong Garden Hose

25, 50, 75, or 100 ft. EXPANDED

Pressure-resistant Latex

Brass

Yes

Spray nozzle

N/A

#3

GrowGreen Expandable Garden Hose

GrowGreen Expandable Garden Hose

25, 50, 75, or 100 ft. EXPANDED

Triple layer Latex

Brass

Yes

Spray nozzle

12 months

#4

ProLawn Expandable Water Hose

ProLawn Expandable Water Hose

50 ft. EXPANDED

Triple layer Latex

Brass

Yes

Spray nozzle

6 months

#5

How to Choose the Best Expandable Hose

What are the features of the best expandable hose? Here is what you should be looking at:

Length

Most people buy hoses because of hose long they are, so this is probably the most important thing if you want the hose to be useful to you. Keep in mind that some expandable hoses (but not all) will tell you their dry length versus their fully expanded length. There should be a great difference between these two numbers, with the expanded length usually being around 3 times as long as the dry length.

Hose Materials

Expandable hoses are made of two layers of material on the actual hose itself. The most important material will be the inner tube, because this is the part that usually ruptures or bursts under pressure. Latex is one of the strongest materials available, but it’s not a perfect fit for the hose. If used with brass connectors, a chemical reaction can happen that will cause the hose to be more prone to bursting at the seams. Unfortunately, this is also seen as one of the strongest combinations of materials, so it’s a common pairing.

Connector Materials

Valves are made of some type of solid metal or plastic. Brass and copper are the most common metals used, and plastic is only used on low-end products, since it’s not as durable as metal. If you have a hose with brass connectors, don’t use it for drinking water regularly, since brace contains trace amounts of lead. It’s fine for use with gardens, cleaning, and other outdoor applications.

Shut-Off Valve

A built-in shut-off valve can be pretty handy for helping you expand the hose more easily. This is a common feature that’s helpful for keeping the hose in good shape throughout a lot of expansions and retractions.

Warranty

Companies that truly stand behind their products can to reassure you that you’re getting something that’s going to last. And, if it doesn’t last, you can get a refund or replacement through the warranty program if it’s still valid.

Additional Pieces Included

Many expandable garden hoses come with a few extra add-ons to make the package more attractive. The most common add-ons are storage bags, spray nozzles, and hose hangers.

Conclusion

From the comparison table above, and based on the features I’ve mentioned, I would recommend the LawnPRO expandable garden hose. It’s the only one on our list that uses copper connectors, so it’s less likely burst under pressure and it can be used for drinking water if you want. It’s long enough for most home use at 50 ft., and it’s got a warranty for 12 months from the manufacturer. The only downside is it doesn’t come with a built-in shut-off valve.

Rosemary Bonsai Tree

The name given to the aromatic herb rosemary (Rosmarius in Latin) means “dew of the sea”.

Rosemary leaves have an extremely sweet fragrance that adds an incredibly appetizing taste to any recipes.

rosemary

The tree of the rosemary is very hardy. It can withstand dry seasons without much watering. This tree can also survive even in colder temperatures if planted in a bonsai pot because it can easily be moved to other locations.

Its flowers ranged from pink and purple through to blue and white.

Rosemary is highly versatile. It can be used as garden decor (hedges) or landscape (topiary), makes for great medicinal herbs and can also adorn the house indoors.

Some Facts About the Bonsai Tree

bonsai

When most people hear the word bonsai, the first thing that comes into their mind are those dwarfed trees grown in a small pot.

Bonsai is a Japanese word that means planted in a container. It is the art of making a miniature from a fully-grown tree complete with landscape designs in a shallow, small vessel.

Most people think that bonsai literally means small or tiny. This is why they often refer to small things or people as bonsai. This reasoning is generally because of the mini version of a tree in a pot.

The best bonsai pots are made from ceramic or porcelain. Plastic and metal containers can also be used but they should be as rigid and strong as the ceramic and porcelain pots to work well. This is because the pots are not just going to be a plant holder but need to support a mini tree.

Bonsai as a type of gardening art originated in China centuries before it was mentioned in Chinese documents in 600 A.D. Ancient Taoists formulated the idea of imitating the dwarfed trees in the forest, by means of planting and growing miniature ones in a pot. They achieved this through constantly cutting and pruning them to their desired height and width.

Those Chinese artists called this art “Penzai”, which literally means tray plant. Penzai was introduced in Japan around the 11th century where it was later known by its present name bonsai. Five centuries after this, bonsai art found its way into the western world, through the Japanese traders, where it was welcomed and embraced with much enthusiasm in middle-class society and most especially by royalty.

How To Make a Rosemary Bonsai Tree

rosemary bonsai

Source: Pinterest

Rosemary is one of the preferred varieties to be planted as a bonsai tree.

Their stems’ natural slender growth and beautiful but very tiny flowers make rosemary popular among bonsai planters. Added to that is their fresh, sweet aroma that can add a feeling of calmness within the house.

Here are some simple steps to follow if you want to make a rosemary bonsai:

Important Note: A dwarf variety of rosemary tree is the best to use as a bonsai plant due to its natural small size.

  1. Pick a small rosemary plant that has a firm but upright stem and lots of branches to work with
  2. Think of a design you want to create before trimming away branches. You can try drawing your desired bonsai style. Cut off all small branches just above the roots
  3. Remove all dead roots, branches and leaves. Do this before placing the plant into the pot. Be extra careful not to break the rosemary from its stem
  4. Start putting the tree into the pot. It’s best to choose a large but shallow pot to allow the roots and foliage more room to grow
  5. Remember to always press the soil gently to prevent any air pockets from forming
  6. Circle the new sprouts with a soft wire to support the stem
  7. Water the plant now but be sure to wait for it to drain out of the holes before stopping. If air pockets form, add more soil, and water it again

Taking Care of a Rosemary Bonsai Tree

  1. Rosemary bonsai should always be partly dry before watering it again as it dies if constantly wet. Consequently, the plant should never be left too dry before rewatering
  2. Bonsai plants are generally intended for indoor displays but, just like other indoor plants, it also needs adequate natural light. Place it somewhere where the sun’s rays can penetrate it directly. Rosemary needs at least 6 to 8 hours of sunlight daily and then to be left in a cool temperature of 5 to 7 degrees C
  3. Since rosemary grows fast, repotting to a larger container is necessary when the tree starts to outgrow its first pot. It needs more space to thrive and to achieve your desired size for your bonsai. Afterward, repotting is required every 2 years

Important Note: When repotting rosemary bonsai, the entire tree should be uprooted very carefully from its present pot. Pop in some new soil to promote healthier new growth and fertilize as soon as the bonsai tree has been replanted.

  1. Fully-grown rosemary bonsai should be nourished with a liquid spray fertilizer every 3 weeks except during the winter season when the tree should stop growing. However, freshly planted rosemary bonsai should be fertilized weekly to encourage growth until it’s repotted. Use a non-acidic fertilizer that also contains potassium and nitrogen
  2. Pruning should be conducted periodically to prevent the bonsai tree from growing bigger than you would like. Trim minimal parts of the roots and cut all leaves that will hinder your design
  3. Do not put wires on old trees as they will tend to break down

Wrap Up

We hope this article has been of great help in your quest to create your own Rosemary bonsai tree.

If you have questions or feedback, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We are always very happy to help and we’ll get back to you promptly.

Happy planting!

Best Weed Puller Reviews

Garden weeding is not a job that many people enjoy, but it can be made easier if you have the right tools. Pulling weeds by hand is tiring and can really hurt your hands after a bit of time. Instead, look for the best weed puller to suit your garden and the types of weeds you’re pulling. A weed puller is going to help you do the job more quickly and with a lot less effort than hand weeding or even using a shovel.

Using a Weed Puller

Using a Weed Puller

A lot of gardeners use shovels of spades to do the job of pulling out tough weeds. This can work for some areas, but it tends to leave large holes around the yard that will then have to be covered up again. Not every area of the garden can handle having holes everywhere. Grass lawns, grow tents, and tight flower beds are bad places to use a spade for weeding. Using a weed puller will make the work faster and more efficient than weeding by hand.

Benefits of Weed Pullers

What can you expect the best weed puller to do for you if you buy it? Here are the benefits you will get if you make the right purchase:

Spare Your Hands

Hand pulling weeds, even if you are wearing gloves, is pretty rough business. Your hands can get torn up and cut by tough weeds like crab grass or thistles. Weed puller eliminate the need to use your hands for pulling tough weeds. Instead, you’ll just get the weed puller itself to do the dirty work for you!

Help Your Back

Not every type of weed puller is designed to take strain off your back, but many long-handled version are available that make it so you don’t have to bend over. No more breaking out the heavy backpack sprayer to get rid of weeds either. If you have any back problems, knee issues, or other physical health problems, a tall weed puller will make a bit difference for your health and comfort while you’re working in the garden.

Easily Remove Common Weeds

Some specialized tools are made to handle heavy-duty weeds, but for the common garden weeds found around North America a regular weed puller is a good option. Some are designed to pull our long-root weeds like Dandelions, while others go for a more complete set of weeds. Either way, a weed puller is going to be helpful for dealing with the unwanted weeds resulting from using fertilizer for grass.

Weed Puller Comparison Table

Image

Type of Weed Puller

Grip

Length

Materials

Weight

Weed Size

Our Rating


Vremi Garden Weeder

Hand twist and pull

Ergonomic rubber

12.5 in.

Cast aluminum

6.4 oz.

Small to medium

#1
Editor Choice


Radius Garden 205 PRO

Hand twist and pull

Ergonomic rubber

42.5 in.

Resin-encased steel shaft + steel blade

3.97 lb.

Medium to large

#2


CobraHead Weeder and Cultivator

Hand twist and pull

Ergonomic recycled plastics

13 in.

Temper steel blade

9.2 oz.

Small to medium

#3


Fiskars Deluxe Stand-up Weeder

Weed grabber

Offset ergonomic handle

39 in.

Stainless steel claw, aluminum shaft, plastic sheath

2 lb.

Small to medium

#4


The Original Lawn Jaws Sharktooth

Hand weed grabber

Hardened rubber

8.7 in.

Steel claws

5.6 oz.

Small to medium

#5

How to Choose the Best Weed Puller

What do you need to look for if you want to make sure you get the best weed puller? Here are the features and characteristics to keep an eye out for when you’re buying:

Type of Weed Puller

There are a lot of varieties of weed pullers. Some use a twisting and pulling method to remove weeds, others have claws that dig in and grab the weeds, and they can be all different heights. The type of weed puller you want to use depends entirely on your specific needs. If you like to get down and dirty pulling weeds, a hand weeder that uses the twist and pull method can be a great option for you.

However, if you want to avoid all the bending and kneeling down to reach the soil, a long shaft weed puller is going to be a great choice for you instead. These come in twist and pull or grabbing styles mostly, and they can be used without stooping over or bending at all.

Grip

A comfortable grip with an ergonomic handle shape is going to make your weed pulling job a bit more pleasant. It’s not really a deal-breaker to skip this part, but it’s something that a lot of people are going to want from a weed puller. Handles that are more comfortable will make it easier to pull weeds for hours at a time.

Length

Whether you want to kneel down and pull weeds or stand a pull, the length is going to make the difference. Some are designed to be tall and are used while you’re standing. Others will be just a few inches long, and should be used with you closer to the ground.

Length also determines how deep you can pull weeds from. If the type of weed you want to pull has a long root or grows deeply into the ground, a longer shaft is going to make it easier to handle those types of weeds.

Materials

Plastic weed pullers will likely not last as long as high-quality metal weed pullers. Pay attention to the blade material for twist and pull weeders, and the entire mechanism for weed grabbers. Grabbers need to be made from a stronger material in order to work effectively as long as you’re using them. This includes the foot pedal, ejection mechanism, handle, and blades, since they will all be interconnected.

Weight

Another feature that probably won’t be a deal-breaker, the weight of the weed puller only really matters if you’ll be using it for extended periods of time or if you are carrying it around a lot. In a normal weeding situation, the weight won’t have much effect on how you use the weeder.

Weed Size

Not every weeder is equipped to handle weeds of all types. Usually they can handle certain size ranges. No weed puller can do it all, so choose one that will do the most for your yard.

Conclusion

From our comparison table above, I want to recommend the Vremi Garden Weeder as the best weed puller. It’s a hand weed puller with a unique shape that makes it easy to yank out most small to medium weeds. The design is both comfortable and very sturdy, with a rubber ergonomic handle and cast aluminum blade and shaft. Overall, this is a good weeder for most gardeners to get rid of pesky weeds from the lawn and garden.

Roses and The Black Dragon Rose

Roses have a reputation for being somewhat troublesome to grow.

With pruning, diseases and special fertilizer to consider, many people are put off before they even start.

This is a shame since it’s really not so tough to enjoy these magnificent flowers. With proper sunlight, adequate drainage and a sensible feeding regime, growing roses is not particularly difficult.

Today, we’ll have a look at growing roses and we’ll also take a glance at the black dragon rose and whether it actually exists or not.

rose

Source: Birds and Blooms

Where To Grow Roses

Think carefully about growing conditions when you are deciding what type of rose to grow. Get this wrong and you’ll face more work with poorer results.

There are two constants needed to grow all kinds of roses, though:

  • Full sunlight
  • Moist soil that’s well-drained and has plenty of organic matter

You’ll need to shoot for at least 6 hours of light each day. Give them less and your plants will not bloom successfully. They’ll also be more prone to attacks from pests or diseases.

While a few varieties of rose will be able to cope with some shade, roses generally dislike shady areas so choose accordingly.

Make sure your plants are sheltered from any strong winds.

Planting Roses

planting roses

Source: Easy Elegance

You want to plant your roses when they are dormant. This can be anywhere from fall through to late winter or early spring.

Bare Root Roses

These roses are sold as sets of roots encased in peat moss. They are best purchased when they are dormant or on the verge of growing.

Soak the rose’s roots for a couple of hours before planting.

Make sure you dig your planting hole wide enough for all the roots to fit in comfortably. It needs to be deep enough for the bud union to rest at soil level. The bud union is where the rose is fixed to the rootstock.

Place your rose in the center of the hole.

Spread the roots out nicely and backfill the hole.

When you tread in your rose, be firm but not excessively hard.

Water well and do not mulch in the first year.

Container-Grown Roses

Although roses grown in containers are more expensive, they are also much less hassle to plant.

Dig your planting hole double the width of the pot and about the same depth.

Remove the rose from its pot and loosen up the roots.

Pop the roots into the hole, backfill with the remaining soil then water thoroughly.

After Planting

Lay down some mulch around your roses 2-3 inches deep. This will help the soil to keep the moisture in and will also keep some soilborne diseases at bay.

Pruning and Deadheading

roses pruning

Source: Armstrong Garden

You need to prune your roses to keep them healthy, vibrant and blooming.

Most gardeners will start pruning at the start of spring either before the plants start growing or just as they are beginning to grow.

You want an open center for your plants to grow. You need air to flow freely throughout.

The more heavy pruning usually takes place early on in the season.

You can continue with deadheading on an ongoing basis. Deadheading is when you cut off any faded blooms.

Not only will your roses look much better, deadheading can also stave off some plant diseases and it will also help to encourage better blooming. Cut any faded flowers to the nearest leaf.

Watering Your Roses

You’ll want to give your roses a pretty steady amount of water. They are not particularly tolerant of drought.

As a rule of thumb, give your roses about 1 inch of water each week.

Water them deeply so that the roots will be coaxed further down.

Feeding

If you have plenty of rich soil or other organic matter in your garden, you can probably skip the fertilizer.

For anyone blighted with poor soil or choosing to grow roses using containers, a proper fertilizing regime is crucial.

A general, all-purpose fertilizer should do the trick. Follow the instructions carefully. Less is more. A heavy-handed approach to feeding can lead to root injury, fewer flowers and even dead roses.

When growing container roses, they will be unable to go any deeper and will rely on you for their nutrients. Slow-release feed is a smart choice. You’ll only need to use this this a couple of times each season and the roses will be fed for months on end.

Pests and Diseases

Like with any plant, roses can suffer from both pests and diseases.

  • Japanese Beetles: These big beetles can strip the plants and foliage in just a few days. You can pick away light attacks of Japanese beetles by hand. Use a garden insecticide for severe outbreaks
  • Black Spot: If you see ugly spots on the foliage of your roses, treat with garden fungicide meant for roses. To prevent black spot, do not plant roses too close together, ensure they get enough sun and avoid using a sprinkler to water them
  • Powdery Mildew: This gray-white film can again be treated with fungicide. Allowing proper airflow helps p

The Black Dragon Rose: What’s It All About?

black dragon rose

Source: Ali Express

If you Google any flower, even the most exotic and uncommon, you’ll usually find a huge range of information.

Searching for the elusive black dragon rose, there is little to be found except random seeds for sale.

The only meaningful background on the black dragon rose is found on this site. The writer’s main point is that rose cultivars are never grown from seed but propagated vegetatively. He also calls into question rogue traders selling these seeds and the poor feedback generated from users.

So…

It would seem that the black dragon rose might well be an urban myth and an easy route to cash for some unscrupulous sellers.

Buyer beware!

Wrap-Up

We hope you have enjoyed this look at roses and the black dragon rose.

Please feel free to share any of our articles on your social media. Drop us a line if you’ve got any questions or feedback. We’ll get back to you very promptly.

Now go and choose some roses!

15-0-15 Fertilizer: What’s It All About?

One of the most thrilling things about gardening is having a lush, green lawn to complement all your plants and flowers.

In addition to a sensible watering regime, you’ll also want to get yourself the best fertilizer for the job.

Today, we’ll take a look at what the numbers like 15-0-15 displayed on the packs of fertilizer mean along with some general tips and guidance on fertilizing your lawn the right way.

The right nutrients are paramount if you want to get the very best out of your lawn.

What Do The Numbers Mean On Fertilizer Packs?

fertilizer

Source: Woerner Landscape Services

When you look at packs of fertilizer, you’ll see 3 numbers quite prominently displayed.

These numbers refer to:

  • Nitrogen
  • Phosphorus
  • Potassium

Your lawn needs plenty of nitrogen so that you’ll get proper growth, a perfect color and overall health to your grass. Warm-season and cool-season grasses both respond well to a slow-release fertilizer rich in nitrogen.

Phosphorus helps to kickstart early growth. This is crucial for your seedlings to develop correctly. If your lawn has been freshly seeded, you should opt for a mix heavy in phosphorus.

You’ll want potassium in your fertilizer to help build up resistance to disease and to add strength to the root structure.

The numbers will always be listed in this order (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium) and illustrate the percentage of each component found in the pack.

A 10-10-10 mix is a very common all-purpose garden fertilizer. To break it down, if you got a 50-pound bag you would have 5 pounds (10%) of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. The remaining 70% of the bag is made up of inert filler to help get the chemicals circulating efficiently.

Using 15-0-15 Fertilizer

fertilizer

SourceWoerner Landscape Services

If you go for a mix of 15-0-15, you’ll have nitrogen and potassium but no phosphorus.

Warm season grasses like Bermuda and St Agustine respond well to this mix. From shrubs and trees through to ornamental gardens or vegetable patches, 15-0-15 has a range of applications.

The ideal time to apply this fertilizer is from the middle of spring on through the summer. You can use it year-round with no problem at all.

Apply it with a spreader, mix lightly and water thoroughly.

Types of Fertilizer

You have a choice of several different types of fertilizer over and beyond the mixes listed above.

Slow-Release

This type of fertilizer does not need to be used as frequently. The trade-off is that it’s usually much more expensive.

Fast-Release

If you want results in a hurry, fast-release fertilizer will deliver.

You’ll need to apply this fertilizer more often and using lesser amounts. Be very cautious not to use too much or you might burn your lawn.

Liquid Fertilizer

These are tough to apply evenly and need to be regularly re-applied so are best avoided.

Organic Materials

Compost and manure are not as concentrated as chemical fertilizers so you’ll need to use a great deal more.

Be very careful with horse manure as it can contain weed seeds.

When To Fertilize Your Lawn

lawns

Source: Pike Nursery

You should ideally fertilize your lawn three times a year.

It’s absolutely essential to feed your lawn while it’s still activelt growing and never during a period of drought.

Start off in early spring as the grass starts to get green.

From that point, your fertilizing schedule will depend on 3 main factors:

  • Climate
  • Type of grass
  • Type of fertilizer

Most lawn seed that you get is a mixture of a few types of grass so fertilizing in spring and fall is advisable.

If there is any kind of drought, either stop using fertilizer or cut it right back. In these conditions, you want to lessen the amount of nutrients your lawn gets so growth will slow back. Reduce watering too if things are too dry for comfort.

How To Fertilize Your Lawn

fertilizer

Source: Curbed Seattle

You can fertilize by hand but the results are questionable. You risk burning the grass if you apply it in too concentrated a manner. If you miss covering other areas adequately, you’ll get pale patches.

The best option is to buy yourself a fertilizer spreader. We reviewed some of the best fertilizer spreaders here.

  • Apply your chosen fertilizer to freshly mown grass. Make sure there is no wind although a fine dew is OK
  • For best results, use only half the suggested amount in your spreader
  • Remember to start working before you turn on your spreader and to shut it down before you come to a stop
  • Make sure you wash your spreader after use
  • Water the lawn for optimum effect. It’s perfect if you can fertilize just before it starts raining but if not then just thoroughly water instead

Is It Possible To Use Too Much Fertilizer?

Yes!

While making sure your lawn gets the added nutrients it dearly needs is wise, being heavy-handed with your fertilizer can lead to problems.

Using too much feed will mean you need to mow your grass far more often.

The grass also tends to grow back quickly so, if this happens, make certain to obey the one-third rule: don’t cut off more than one-third of the leaf blade in one session of mowing. If you end up scalping the lawn, you’re inviting the weeds in.

Also, over-fertilizing can lead to turfgrass diseases setting in. Both pythium and brown patch take root in warm and moist conditions where over-fertilization has occurred. You’ll need some fungicide to fight back if these diseases take hold.

If you go totally over the top and grossly exceed the recommended application rate, you’ll finish up with scorched yellow grass and a ruined lawn.

The key? Less is more with fertilizing.

Wrap-Up

Well, hopefully you have enjoyed our explanation of 15-0-15 fertilizer and you now have a clear idea of what the numbers on fertilizer packages translate to.

Please feel free to share any of our articles on your social media if you think they would be of interest.

Contact us at any time if you have any questions or there’s anything you’d like to know about any aspect of gardening.

Now get that fertilizer spreader going!

Purple Tomatillo

When it comes to growing fresh fruit and vegetables in your garden, you really are spoiled for choice.

There are so many different options at your disposal and you can sometimes get paralyzed by choice and stuck for ideas.

If you have got the basics covered and want to branch out with something slightly less commonplace, it could be time to look at growing some purple tomatillos. If you enjoy Mexican food, this will be a great addition to your garden.

What Is a Purple Tomatillo?

purple tomatillo

Source: Milking Almonds

The tomatillo is native to Mexico. It’s one of the oldest fruit-bearing plants used as far back as 800BC by the Aztecs.

Physalis philadelphica has sweet purple fruits the size of marbles.

Physalis ixocarpa, frequently sold in markets, boasts large green fruits that ripen to a pale yellow. These have a very tart taste.

Fragile husks cover the tomatillo. Towards the end of summer, fruits dangle copiously from the branches.

Tomatillos are members of the nightshade family and they are a core If Mexican food. It’s the citrusy yet sweet flavor of tomatillos that give a kick to green salsa.

The purple tomatillo grows throughout the Americas apart from in the extreme north. It’s most prevalent in Mexico.

Uses for Purple Tomatillo

purple tomatillos

Source: A Growing Tradition

Tomatillos are a staple ingredient of the green sauces common to Mexican and Central American cooking.

With a tart flavor and vibrant green coloring, tomatillos are very widely used.

Purple tomatillo has a sweeter taste. They are great in jams and preserves.

You can keep ripe tomatillos in the fridge for a couple of weeks and they’ll still be good to eat. If you remove the husks and keep them in sealed Ziploc bags, they’ll last even longer. If you want some to last you through the colder seasons, pop them in the freezer.

Where To Grow Purple Tomatillo

Choosing the right growing site is key with any plant.

You’ll want to find somewhere with full exposure to the sun. Make sure that the soil is fairly rich and well-drained. Although the tomatillo is a wild plant, it is pretty intolerant of saturated soil.

Before you plant your seeds, it pays to mix in a few inches of compost. If you fork this over nicely, it will help with drainage if this is an issue.

If you’ve got heavy clay soil in your garden, raised beds are a great way to grow purple tomatillos.

Planting Purple Tomatillos

A couple of months before the last frost of the year, start your tomatillo seeds indoors.

Before transplanting them outdoors when the time is right, make sure to harden the plants first.

When then the soil is nicely warm and any realistic chance of frost is history, set them outside at the same time as you start your tomatoes.

Plant tomatillos deeply. The roots of the plant will sprout along the stem so it’s worth accommodating them properly for best results.

The purple tomatillo will grow up to 3 or 4 feet tall. You’ll get the same 3 or 4 feet in width. Make sure you keep your plants 3 feet apart. Space the rows 3 to 4 feet.

You can make use of tomato cages or trellis to give your tomatillos some added support.

If you are looking to cater for your own family cooking only, just 2 to 4 plants will be more than enough.

Growing Purple Tomatillos

If you are just starting out gardening or perhaps you just want something that will grow without too much interference, purple tomatillos make a smart choice.

They are prolific and will keep on producing until they are taken out of commission by the onset of frosts.

Put down about 2 or 3 inches of grass clippings or other organic mulch. This will keep the soil nice and moist while staving off intruding weeds.

Give them an inch or so of water once a week. They are fairly tolerant to drought but they prefer a little moisture.

You don’t need any fertilizer with purple tomatillos.

They really are a breeze to grow and incredibly rewarding.

Harvesting Purple Tomatillos

Once you have transplanted your seeds, you’ll be anywhere from 75 to 100 days from harvest.

When the husks are filled out and look on the verge of splitting, it’s time for harvest.

You can store them in their husks at room temperature for up to a week. If you put them in the fridge, they’ll be fine for as long as 3 weeks.

Make sure you harvest all your tomatillos. Chuck any that are rotten or overripe onto your compost. The last thing you want is self-sown seedlings so do a thorough job at harvesting time.

Maintaining Purple Tomatillos

As you’ve seen, tomatillos are extremely easy to grow.

They very seldom suffer from any insect pest problems or disease.

If you cage the tomatillo plants off the ground, this will keep them out of the reach of slugs and snails, protect them from early blight and allow air to circulate effectively.

Since they are not as heavy as tomatoes, the small wire cages you use for your tomatoes will be perfectly strong enough for your tomatillos as well.

Preparing Your Tomatillos

As with all aspects of the tomatillo, preparation is super-simple.

Just tear off the husks and give the fruits a wash. There is no need to core or seed them.

You can eat them raw or cook them so if you are stuck for inspiration, we’ll point you in the right direction of some mouth-watering recipes before we finish up.

Purple Tomatillo Recipes

tomatillo

Source: Andrea Myers

This site has some tasty purple tomatillo recipes along with great background information on this delicious nightshade.

Wrap-Up

We hope you have enjoyed this snapshot of the purple tomatillo.

One of the real pleasures of gardening is the ability to eat fresh, organic fruit and vegetables lovingly grown with your own hands. Do something different this year and try some tomatillos!

Please feel free to share any of our articles on your social media. If you have any comments or feedback, just get in touch.

Happy growing!

Best Chainsaw Chain for Hardwood Reviews

As you can imagine, not all chainsaws are created equal. Different chainsaws are suited to different jobs, so if you are looking to cut hardwood, you need a chainsaw that can effectively handle the job. But even once you find that perfect chainsaw, there is still more work to be done: you must find the best chainsaw chain for hardwood as well.

Chances are your chainsaw came with a chain, but it isn’t always the best chain for the job. For example, those who need professional chainsaws might need a better chain. And if you are cutting hardwood, you will need chains that can handle that. Even if your chainsaw chain is perfect now, it will need to be replaced eventually, either because it becomes damaged or because your chainsaw sharpener can no longer save it. To make the best choice, you need to find one that fits your chainsaw and is effective at cutting through tough or dried wood.

Applications for Chainsaws and Their Chains

For most chainsaw owners, it isn’t all that often that they use it. They purchase it for small jobs around the yard and only use it a few times a year. However, those who use their chainsaws with hardwood usually do so because it is part of their profession, or because they need to cut a lot of firewood for their home.

When it comes to professional use or firewood, you need to be sure you have a quality chain. If working with hardwood, you are looking for a chain that is very durable and offers a high gauge. This allows the teeth of the chain to tear through more wood at a time.

Who are some people that might need to purchase the best chainsaw chain for hardwood? There are those who have a need for firewood, those who have heavily wooded property they need to maintain, and various professions, such as loggers, construction workers, and even wood carvers. And even if you do not fall into any of these categories, if you want maximum flexibility with your chainsaw, a chain that can handle all woods including hardwood is best.

Do You Need Different Chains for Different Woods?

Chainsaw chain for kind of good

The answer to this is both yes and no. If you are going to be cutting hardwood, you need a chain that can specifically handle hardwood. Cut these chains can be used to cut softer woods as well. The primary issue in using a hardwood chain for softer woods is that you will not get as precise of a result as you would with a chain that offers a small gauge. For some uses, this matters a lot, but for most casual users, this will not pose a problem. So, if you are expecting to use your chainsaw on different types of wood but precision is not a big concern, the best chainsaw chain for hardwood could be your best chainsaw chain overall.

When to Replace a Chainsaw Chain for Hardwood

If you purchased your chainsaw and it came with a chain that is suited to hardwood, you can wait until it wears down or sustains damage. If you did not purchase a chainsaw with a chain that handles hardwood well, you will need to replace it before you use it on any hardwood. Assuming your chainsaw already has a good chain, you should look for signs of problems before and during each use.

The most common sign of a problem is that the chainsaw is not cutting as well as it used to. This usually can be fixed by sharpening the chain, but eventually even sharpening will not be able remedy this. Another common sign of trouble is that the chain or bar seems to bend when you are cutting.

Step number one is to have the chain sharpened. You can do this at home with a chainsaw chain sharpener or you can take it to a service center that offers this service. If this does not fix the issue, you should replace the chain, otherwise accidents are likely to happen. If teeth come off the chain, even if the other teeth are still working fine, you should still replace the chain. And, if you feel like the chain is reaching the point that it might break, stop using the chainsaw until the chain can be replaced.

Top 5 Chainsaw Chains for Hardwood Comparison Table

Product Name

Depth Gauge

Tooth Type

Tooth Arrangement

Our Rating

STIHL 33 RSF 72 Oilomatic Rapid Super Skip Tooth Chainsaw Chain 20"

.050

Full chisel

Full skip

#1
Editor Choice

Oregon 36" Chainsaw Chain

.063

Full chisel

Full skip

#2

uxcell 404Pitch 64 Drivers 063 Gauge Full Skip Chainsaw

.063

Semi chisel

Full skip

#3

OREGON 75CJ115G

.063

Semi chisel

Standard

#4

OREGON 75CJ105G

.063

Semi chisel

Standard

#5

How to Choose the Best Chainsaw Chain for Hardwood

When choosing the best chainsaw chain for hardwood, you need to look at many different features. To help you understand how various chainsaw features impact your using them with hardwood, take a look at them below. Please note, we are not looking at all possible features, only those that impact the effectiveness of a chain when using it on hardwood.

Tooth Material: Since the teeth function as blades that cut into the wood, you need a strong material. When it comes to cutting hardwood, the stronger the material, the better for you.

Tooth Type: The two most common types of chainsaw teeth are full-chisel and semi-chisel. Full-chisel teeth cut faster, but semi-chisel teeth will stay sharper longer. For the majority of people using their chainsaw with hardwood, semi-chisel teeth are best, since they can cut through tough woods without instantly dulling.

Depth Gauges: This refers to how deep the teeth can cut. When it comes to hardwood, deeper gauges are better, as they bite further into the wood. However, this can cause the teeth to sometimes become stuck, which results in kickback.

Tooth Arrangement: This refers to the ratio of teeth to drive links. Standard chains have a one-to-one ratio. Full skip chains have a ratio of two drive links to one tooth, and semi skip chains alternate between a one-to-one ration and the two-to-one ration of the full skip. If you need smooth results with hardwood, a standard chain is best, but for most hardwood applications, such as cutting firewood or logging, full skip and semi skip are better.

In addition to these features, which you must choose based on the type of wood you are cutting, there are other features you must match to your chainsaw. These features include the gauge, which is different from depth gauge, pitch, and length.

Conclusion

When selecting the best chainsaw chain for hardwood, you first need to make certain you select a chain that meets the specifications of your chainsaw, otherwise its use will not be safe, or will it be effective. Once you know those specifics, you can look for the depth gauge, tooth type, and tooth arrangement that is best for cutting hardwoods. Keep in mind that you will need different chains for rough cuts than for precise cuts, and buy the best chainsaw chain for hardwood accordingly.

Best Chainsaw Bar Reviews

For most of us, a chainsaw really isn’t an item you customize. You simply look for the chainsaw you like best, and once you find it, that is pretty much it. Sure, you will need to sharpen the chain from time to time, and replace it when needed, but beyond that, you just leave it alone, never thinking about if another option would be the best chainsaw bar.

But for those who use their chainsaw for professional purposes or who use it fairly frequently, it can be necessary to change things up a bit. And the place where customization is most common is with the chainsaw bar. To help you navigate this customization option for your chainsaw, we have assembled a list of the five best chainsaw bars on the market today.

What Are Chainsaws Good For?

For those who do not use their chainsaw for professional purposes, their chainsaw is mainly used to take care of simple tasks around the house. It might be used to trim trees, or to cut up branches that fall after a storm. For those with wood-burning fireplaces, it might be used to cut firewood. In general, those who are using chainsaws for non-professional purposes will not purchase a chainsaw bar for customization purposes, but they might need to replace theirs due to damage or wear and tear over time.

Those who use their chainsaws for professional purposes are much more likely to seek a chainsaw bar for customization purposes specific to their needs, opting for the best chainsaw bar for each job. And there are many professions that require the use of chainsaws, such as landscapers, wood artisans, and even firemen. Different aspects of their jobs can require different lengths of bars, so they might even keep several sizes on hand.

What Is a Chainsaw Bar?

Before you get into replacing or customizing your chainsaw bar, you should understand what it is. In essence, the chainsaw bar is the guide for the chainsaw chain. Your chain must fit perfectly against the bar for safety and effectiveness. The chain runs along the bar, rotating and cutting through the wood. The length of the bar also determines the balance of the chainsaw, how fast it cuts, and the diameter of the wood the chainsaw can handle.

Why Might You Change the Bar on Your Chainsaw?

The first reason to replace your chainsaw bar is that it is looking worse for wear or has been damaged. Damaged chainsaw bars are highly problematic. Beyond not being the best chainsaw bar to use, they are actually dangerous. For example, a bent bar does not provide a steady guide for the chain, and the chain can fly off, injuring you and others. Chips in the bar can also cause the same issues, and both chips and bent bars can damage chainsaw chains, resulting in your needing to replace both the bar and the chain.

However, not everyone who wants to replace their chainsaw bar does so because of problems with the bar. As noted above, professionals will often want to customize bar length to suit their needs. This can be because they are working in a small space and need a smaller bar, or they are cutting thick pieces of wood and need a longer bar. However, when choosing the best chainsaw bar for you, there are a few things you need to consider, which we will explain below.

Top 5 Chainsaw Bars Comparison Table

Product Name

Image

Length

Weight

Purpose

Our Rating

Oregon 105671 20-Inch Replacement Chain Saw Bar

Oregon 105671 20-Inch Replacement Chain Saw Bar and Chain Combo For Stihl

20 inches

3 pounds, including chain

Cutting large or thick logs.

#1
Editor Choice

Intenz Bar/Chain 16" S56

Intenz Bar/Chain 16" S56

16 inches

1.8 pounds, including chain

Multi-purpose, works with most types of wood.

#2

Oregon 540391 16-Inch Pro-Lite Bar

Oregon 540391 16-Inch Pro-Lite Bar and 22BPX

16 inches

1.9 pounds, including chain

Multi-purpose, works with most types of wood.

#3

ISE 18" Falcon Chainsaw Bar

ISE 18" Falcon Chainsaw Bar to Fit Stihl

18 inches

N/A

Cutting large and thick logs

#4

Poulan Pro 14" Guide Bar & Chain

Poulan Pro 14" Guide Bar & Chain BLUE Color Match

14 inches

1 pound, including chain

Cutting shorter and thinner pieces of wood, like branches

#5

How to Choose the Best Chainsaw Bar

Many chainsaw bar buying guides talk about things such as pitch and gauge when determining which chainsaw bar is right for you. However, these criteria actually describe the chainsaw chain, not the chainsaw bar, so they are not what you should be looking at when buying the best chainsaw bar for you. The goal should not be to fit the bar to the chain, but to fit the bar to the motor and the chain to the bar. Below are the criteria you should consider when buying a chainsaw bar.

Length

The length of your chainsaw bar determines how quickly it cuts and the diameter of the wood it can handle. Shorter bars cut faster, but longer bars can handle thicker pieces of wood. And while it might be tempting to select your chainsaw bar simply based on the reason you are using it, this can be a dangerous decision.

Why can this be a dangerous decision? Because the first thing you should consider when choosing a chainsaw bar is the power of the engine in your chainsaw. A low-powered engine with a long bar creates a very dangerous situation, and a very high-powered engine with a short bar can cause similar issues. With too little power for the bar, the chainsaw will struggle to work, making it harder to control. With too much power for the bar, it can cause the chainsaw to pull on you and take away your control, similar to the way placing a big engine in a tiny car would make it harder for the driver to control.

Your user manual for your chainsaw should specify which bar lengths are safe for your engine. However, if you do not have this manual, you still need to make a safe decision. A 30 cc to 45 cc engine can handle bars from 10 inches to 14 inches in length. 40 cc to 50 cc engines pair with 14-inch to 16-inch chain bars. 50 cc to 60 cc engines can handle 18 inch and 20 inch bars.

Weight

Another factor to consider is the weight. Longer bars change the balance of the chainsaw, and this can make it harder for you to handle the weight. Which weight is best for you depends less on the chainsaw and more on what you are comfortable with. The best chainsaw bar for you should be one you can handle easily without becoming fatigued.

Purpose

Finally, you should consider the purpose you will be using the chainsaw for. Thin pieces of wood can be cut with shorter bars, while thicker pieces of wood need longer bars. However, always defer to what is safe for the engine rather than what you think will best suit your purpose.

Conclusion

Whether you are replacing a damaged bar or trying to customize your chainsaw, it is important that you consider length, weight, and purpose when choosing which is the best chainsaw bar for you. However, the most important factor to consider is which length is best suited to the engine power of your chainsaw. Remember, the safest choice is the best choice.

Best Chainsaw for Firewood Reviews

What is the best way to spend a winter’s evening? For many, it is curled up in front of the fire. And while gas and electric fireplaces are plentiful, nothing quite beats the authenticity of a wood burning fireplace. And if you are going to make the most of owning such a fireplace, you need to purchase the best chainsaw for firewood.

For those unfamiliar with chainsaws, it might come as a shock that you need different types of chainsaws for different applications. However, if you are looking to get the best results, it is important. Let’s take a look at some things about chainsaws you need to understand as a buyer.

What Are Chainsaws Good For?

professional chainsaw man

Since we are talking about the best chainsaw for firewood, it is clear that this is one thing chainsaws are good for is cutting firewood, but this isn’t the only reason you should own one. In general, a chainsaw is a handy item to have around. Even if you do not have a fireplace, you can use a chainsaw designed to handle firewood for trimming back your trees, cutting up a fallen tree for easy removal, and even to cut wood scraps from DIY projects into smaller pieces for easy hauling.

What to Know About Owning a Chainsaw for Firewood

Chainsaws designed to cut firewood are meant to work quickly and efficiently while being easy on your body to handle. This means that they are generally lighter in weight than many other chainsaws and easier to control. However, they are not designed to make very precise cuts, as this is not a great concern when cutting firewood. If you are looking for a chainsaw that can handle other applications besides cutting firewood, it may be best to search for a chainsaw that is specific to those other needs and can also be used for cutting firewood.

Top 5 Chainsaws for Firewood Comparison Table

Product Name

Image

Weight

Power Source

Engine Power

Bar Length

Anti-Vibration Technology

Our Rating

DEWALT DCCS690H1

DEWALT DCCS690H1 40V 6AH Lithium Ion XR Brushless Chainsaw, 16"

20 pounds

40-volt battery

40 volts, equivalent to the 35cc to 45 cc range

16 inches

No

#1
Editor Choice

Echo CS-590 20" Timber Wolf Chainsaw

Echo CS-590 20" Timber Wolf Chainsaw

17 pounds

Gas

59.8cc

20 inches

Yes

#2

Sun Joe ION16CS 16-Inch 4-Amp 40-Volt Cordless Chain Saw

Sun Joe ION16CS 16-Inch 4-Amp 40-Volt Cordless Chain Saw

12.8 pounds

40-volt battery

40 volts, equivalent to the 35cc to 45 cc range

16 inches

No

#3

Husqvarna 460 Rancher 20-Inch

Husqvarna 460 Rancher 20-Inch 60.3cc 2-Stoke X-Torq Gas Powered Chain Saw (CARB Compliant)

12.79 pounds

Gas

60.3cc

20 inches

Yes

#4

Poulan P3314 14-Inch

Poulan P3314 14-Inch 33cc 2-Cycle Gas-Powered Chain Saw

16 pounds

Gas

33cc

14 inches

No

#5

How to Choose the Best Chainsaw for Firewood

Not all chainsaws are created equal, and when it comes to choosing the best chainsaw for firewood, you need to consider a variety of factors. The best chainsaw for one person won’t be the best option for another. Below are some things you should consider when selecting the option that is best for you.

Weight

Chainsaws are dangerous items, even those with plenty of safety features. Because of this, you need to make sure that the chainsaw you buy is one you can easily handle. One of the biggest factors in this will be the weight of the machine. You need to choose a chainsaw that you can hold, lift, and manipulate easily. And if you will be spending a lot of time using it, you need to consider how fatigued you will be come over time.

Power Source

Your power source affects several aspects of chainsaw use. The biggest is mobility. Gas and battery operated chainsaws allow you to work anywhere, but an electric chainsaw necessitates that you are tethered to a power source. Another consideration is weight. Batteries and gas tanks will add weight to the chainsaw, but electric models add no weight, making the chainsaw easier to handle. Another aspect impacted by power source is how easy the chainsaw is to start; gas-powered models sometimes resist starting, while battery-powered and electric-powered models turn on with the flip of a switch.

Engine Power

Chainsaw bar lenght

Cutting firewood is a tough job, and you need a chainsaw with the engine power to handle it. Of course, how much engine power you need will depend on the type and size of wood you are working with. Engine power is measured in cc, which stands for cubic centimeters.

A mistake many buyers make is selecting a chainsaw based on the length of the bar more so than the engine power it offers. It is important to understand that bat length can always be changed, but the power the engine offers remains fixed. However, it is best to purchase a chainsaw that offers both the engine power you need and the bar length you prefer. And keep in mind that the more powerful the chainsaw, the longer the bar in can handle.

So, how much power do you need? The factor to consider is the diameter of the wood you will be cutting. If you are cutting wood that is under 12 inches in diameter, 35cc to 45 cc will do. For wood in the range of 12 inches to 16 inches in diameter, opt for engine power in the range of 45cc to 55cc. For logs ranging between 16 inches and 22 inches in diameter, look for an engine with a minimum of 55cc and up to 70cc. And should you need to cut wood that is over 22 inches in diameter, look for an engine offering over 70cc. However, unless you have plenty of experience with chainsaws, it is best that you leave jobs that require such power to the professionals.

Bar Length

As noted above, bar length can be changed, so it is not the biggest factor to consider. However, it is important to note that you should make certain the bar length is appropriate for the power the engine offers; placing a long bar on an underpowered chainsaw is very dangerous. If you are inexperienced with chainsaws, it is best to purchase one with your preferred bar length from the start.

So, how do you determine the bar length you need? While the diameter of the wood you are cutting might impact this decision a bit, you really should base it on what you can comfortably handle. The longer the bar length, the more unbalanced the chainsaw and the harder it is to control. Another thing to consider is cutting speed. While a longer bar can handle a larger diameter with fewer passes, a smaller bar actually cuts faster. If you are uncertain about what you can handle or the speed you need, it is better to go for a shorter bar than a longer one.

Anti-Vibration Technology

Finally, you should consider whether or not you need anti-vibration technology. If you are not going to be cutting firewood regularly, the best chainsaw for firewood for you might not need this technology. But if you are planning to use it regularly or for long periods of time when you do use it, this technology is a must. This prevents the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome and also makes the chainsaw more comfortable to use overall.

Conclusion

If you are looking for the best chainsaw for firewood, there is no one-size-fits-all option. In order to make the best choice for you, you must consider the weight of the chainsaw, the power source it uses, the engine power it offers, the bar length, and the anti-vibration technology. However, we are confident that if you select any of our five choices above, you will be happy with your purchase.

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