Olive Oil Mister Reviews That Will More Than Convince You

If you wonder what the best olive oil mister has to compare to regular cooking sprays or oil bottles, you’re not alone. Oil misters sound like a pointless invention, but they’re actually very useful for a few reasons. I want to help you learn a bit more about olive oil misters, so you can learn why they’re useful and how to choose a good one to fit your needs.

Contents

What Does an Olive Oil Mister Do?

best Olive Oil Mister

Oil misters serve the same purpose as aerosol cooking spray cans, except that they do a better job. Unlike a disposable aerosol can, you can re-use an oil mister until it breaks. You can also fill it with your preferred type of oil, instead of using unhealthy cooking sprays. A mister can also be used to help even out serving sizes. For example, if you’re using oil and vinegar salad dressings, misters are a great way to keep from adding too much oil.

It’s much more convenient to use cooking oil if you don’t have to pour it straight from a large container. A mister simply cuts the bottle out of the equation and allows you to apply smaller, more precise amounts of oil to whatever you’re cooking, or to meals you’ve already prepared.

Benefits of Using a Mister

How can an olive oil mister actually help you? It doesn’t sound like it at first, but a mister is much better than using a regular oil container or a cooking spray! Here’s what you can expect from the best olive oil mister in your kitchen:

Easy to use

Pouring from a large oil bottle is not as convenient as simply pulling a trigger or pressing a button to spray. You can apply oil evenly and in the right amount with a mister, whereas you may have difficulty getting the right amount with a bottle or aerosol spray.

Healthier than cooking sprays

The best benefit of a mister over and aerosol cooking spray is that you can choose the type of oil you want to use. This means you can pick a healthy oil and avoid the unnatural, unhealthy ingredients that are in cooking sprays. Choose your favorite oil, including olive oil, liquid coconut oil, sunflower seed oil, or any other type that you like the best.

Cut down on waste and spills

Most oil bottles don’t have a nozzle that catches drizzles to return to the main chamber. So instead, the oil drips hopelessly down the side of the bottle and ends up wasted. This may not seem like much oil at first, but it does add up. Plus, bottles are easier to spill or knock over accidentally. Aerosol cans aren’t any better with waste, because they can’t be used once the aerosol is used up, no matter how much spray is left.

An olive oil mister avoids both of these problems, because it can use all of the oil inside and it doesn’t drip in the same way as a bottle.

Keep your kitchen cleaner

That little drip that runs down the side of your bottle doesn’t just waste, but it also makes your kitchen counters or cabinets very dirty over time. Misters don’t have this same issue with dripping, making them a good solution if you want to keep a cleaner kitchen.

Top 5 Olive Oil Mister Reviews Comparison Table

Product Name

Image

Capacity

Spray Type

Materials

Misting Settings

Our Rating

The Fine Life Ideal Olive Oil Mister Air Pressure Only Clog-Free Sprayer Black

About 1/2 cup

Pressure pump cap, non-aerosol

BPA-free plastics

Fine mist only

#1
Editor Choice

Vremi Olive Oil Dispenser Bottle - 17 Oz Oil Bottle Glass with No Drip Bottle Spout - Oil Pourer Dispensing Bottles for Kitchen

17oz.

Pressure pump, Dripless pouring

Glass, silicone, BPA-free plastics

Controlled dispensing

#2

Olive Oil and Vinegar Sprayer Set by Cookisy for Portion Control Cooking and Baking, Includes Silicone Funnel (3 pcs)

80ml.

Pressure pump cap, non-aerosol

Aluminum, BPA-free plastics

Mist only

#3

Evo Kitchen and Grill Olive Oil and Cooking Oil Trigger Sprayer Bottle, Refillable, Non-Aerosol, 18-Ounce Capacity

6, 8, 16, or 18oz.

Trigger pull, non-aerosol

BPA and DEHP-free plastics

Twist to adjust flow

#4

Misto Frosted Glass Bottle Oil Sprayer

About 1/2 cup

Pressure pump cap, non-aerosol

BPA-free plastics OR glass, metal sprayer cap

Mist only

#5

How to Choose The Olive Oil Mister

What do you need to look for in the best olive oil mister? Here are the features to check:Capacity

How much oil do you use when you’re cooking? If you cook a lot, or you frequently make large amounts of food, go for a larger capacity to avoid having to re-fill it all the time. Otherwise, a smaller capacity shouldn’t be an issue for the average person or family.Spray type

You don’t need to look for a high capacity pump sprayer like you’d find for the yard! Instead, look at the few varieties that are offered. The most common types by far are the trigger pull sprayers and the pressure pump cap sprayers. Each are easy to use, reliable, and simple to clean when necessary. Some sprayers have anti-clog mechanisms that may help you keep them cleaner.Materials

Olive oil misters should always be made with 100% food-safe materials. This includes BPA-free plastics, glass, aluminum, silicone, and some other types of materials. If the mister is made from anything that you don’t recognize, check out what that material is first to find out if it’s certified to be food-safe or not. You don’t want to end up with something like a fertilizer spreader that’s only meant for chemicals, not food!Misting settings

Keep in mind that a mister isn’t supposed to give a steady flow like a garden hose. Instead, it’s supposed to give off a mist, a thin stream, or any otherwise small and controllable amount of oil at once. No need for heavy-duty spraying, because this is only cooking oil we’re talking about here. Keep that in mind when you’re looking at reviews, because it isn’t as big of a feature as some people might make it out to seem. The mist settings might matter in some cases, but for most people they won’t change the usefulness of the sprayer.

Steps to Starting a Garden

First Step: Decide What You Want to Grow 

This is a super important step, and probably one of the easiest. I know before I began gardening, I always had certain fruits, veggies, herbs, and flowers that I loved and knew I would enjoy growing. If you are not as passionate and aware of what you want to grow right off the bat, a good way to look at it is this: if you won't eat it, don't grow it in your garden. If it will not benefit and satisfy your family and yourself, there really is not much reason to grow it. If you don't like the smell or look of a flower, why spend your time on it? When you are just starting out, focus on growing fruits, vegetables, flowers, and herbs that your family enjoys the most. Once you have been tending to a garden for a while, you can begin getting creative and experiment with various plants.

Another thing to remember when you are growing is to make sure your picks can be grown in your area. Do the research to find what your gardening zone is as well as the estimated first and last frost dates. A good way to gain more knowledge and get all the information you need is to talk to thriving gardeners in your area. They will know exactly how to give you the lowdown on which crops grow well in your area and which you need to hang up. Just because you love a plant or a flower does not make it smart to grow where you live.

Make sure whatever you grow will not exceed the size of your garden. If all you have is a medium or small backyard garden space, then it is not smart to grow a huge vegetable that will form roots sprawling out all over the garden and into your other plants. Remember to think through all the reasons why a certain plant would do well or would do horribly, and adjust accordingly. If you consider where you live and the weather, the type of plants and produce you and your family would find useful, and plants that grow to be moderate size, you are well on your way.

Step Two: Where will you grow your garden?

Before you get started, keep in mind that fruits and vegetables need full and direct sunlight. Some need partial shade while others need hours of direct sunlight, so be sure to do your research before you find your perfect spot. Think of where in your backyard you will position to the garden. How will you get to the garden for tending to, watering and caring for your plants?

If it is hidden away, it will be easier to ignore and avoid tending to. Keep it in plain view, but make sure to keep it away from windy areas or frosty dips in the ground, which are usually low areas where the snow piles high. Watch out for things like random animals in your backyard, pet damage (both yours and others) and children's playing and little feet. Plan your garden with all these things in mind and as far away from the trouble as possible.

Step Three: Plan Plan Plan

Brainstorm where you will lay seed down, how you will separate everything, and precisely what you will grow the first time around. Get all your research done to find exactly what plants grow best in the same garden, see what kind of fertilizer you'll need for them, and figure out a proper watering and tending schedule. This is also the time to set up a routine or create a habit in your schedule that will determine how frequently you care for the garden. This will depend on what plants you chose in step one. The planning stage is where you avoid any hiccups in the planting stage, so make sure to be as thorough as possible.

Step Four: Get Your Tools Together

This is the time for you to find all the tools you will need. Here is our advice: Splurge on them. Don't get flimsy plastic or skimp on cheap tools. They may do the trick now, but once they break you will be in a pinch. Remember that this is a long term investment. If you get good tools, you will have them for a long time to come.

As for which tools to get, there are some incredible lists online that will give you extensive look on every single tool possibly needed in a garden. Now, you don't need to get carried away. It is always smart to create some type of budget to follow and just begin by purchasing the basics first, then adding on as you go. If you are looking for cheaper than normal prices on high quality and minimally used tools, try shopping around at various estate sales, garage sales, and other second-hand places. Lastly, remember that there are a variety of tool sizes for a reason. The purpose of getting tools that are your correct size is to avoid any injury, so this is very important!

Step Five: Plant & Nurture

This is where it gets real. You are at long last, ready to begin! Plant, just like your heart depends on it. This is the fun part. In a few months time, you will begin reaping the benefits of what you are sowing and it is a beautiful thing. The most important part at this stage if remaining intentional. There is a quote floating around basically tells us that the best fertilizer for our gardens are our shadows. Think of your garden as a newborn. At this stage, it is fully dependent on you. it needs you on a consistent basis and it cannot live if you do not care for it.

We know this is a huge project to take on, but it is so worthwhile and meaningful! You will not regret getting your hands buried in the soil, enjoying the fresh cool breeze on your face, and becoming one with nature in this special and sacred way. We wish you all the best on your gardening journey!

Plant care is so important. If you hope for vibrant, life-giving, and healthy plants, you will need to keep up with their needs and tend to them consistently. With plants, as with children and pets, the basics are a bit more complicated than you might expect. Watering can be done too much or not enough. Sunlight can be too harsh or too dim.

Plants don't all go together, and it can become a sticky situation for you, the caregiver, if they do not get along and one wants to overrun the other with leaves or weeds. Not all plants fit with your lifestyle, others fit perfectly. When it comes to caring for plants, there are so many fine lines. A little too much or not enough can be bad news whichever way it falls.

1. Give Them Stability and Consistency

We all like change every once in a while. Change of pace, change of setting, change of circumstances. Part of this changing can sometimes consist of rearranging furniture and decorations. This includes plants. If you are looking to properly care for your plants, think consistency. They are not like you, they do not like to change settings every now and then. Actually, change can do much more harm than good.

Consider their natural state. Plants grow out of the ground and they do not move, ever. Their entire life is lived in one place. Give them the same home life stability as you would give a school-aged kid. Instability is a trauma for your greenery, and constant or drastic changes put undue stress and strain on them. Not only do they not need to be moved a ton out of their needed sunlight levels, but they also need the temperature to remain about the same. As a rule of thumb, keep them away from radiators, A/C units, and air vents. They don't life drafts.

2. Find the Right Fit for Your Lifestyle

You need to begin thinking about planting as parenting. Regardless of if you are growing a garden, bringing in houseplants, keeping up a Terrarium or an indoor greenhouse, caring for a large greenhouse, or simply growing herbs in your kitchen windowsill. No matter what form you are planning on caring for, you need to be well informed as to the needs of that specific plant. Remember that with plants, it is NEVER about what the needs of the plants are, but what your needs are. Though you need to think of your plants as kids or pets, there is a way to personalize this living thing to your schedule in a way you can't do with the others.

Are you super busy at work and work long hours, out of the home? Do you travel a ton and on the fly, for work or leisure, for tons of days at a time? Are you just a forgetful person who is not great with added responsibility? Good news, you can own plants! You will get along well with low maintenance plants like succulents, or snake plants.

Look into all the varieties that only need watering a few times a month. Cactuses and succulents will actually like you more if you give them their space. Think of them as your super introverted friend. You can go long stints of time without bugging them but when you do check up on them, they are thriving.

Are you a stay at home/work at home mom/dad, work at home professional, or have a super flexible schedule? Are you a big homebody with normal work hours? Do you not find yourself traveling not too much, but enjoy a quieter, simpler life or have home responsibilities that don't allow for this lifestyle?

If you find yourself with more time on your hands than the first person, then you can tend to more needy and hands-on plants. These include air plants, orchids, and ferns. These call for light watering frequently. 

3. Keep Your Leafy Friends Close Enough to Check on Them

As a general rule, it is a good idea to keep your plants where you can see them! Don't hide them in stuffy places. Not only is the sunlight bad in those areas, but you will also not be able to keep track of when you should be watering them! These plants need all the TLC they can get, especially at first. It will no doubt take some time to fully get to know them on a deep level so all it takes is a single glance to tell what they need.

It's like getting a roommate! Keep your plant on your desk, in your windowsill, on your table, or in other places that are in plain sight. Then watch them. Keep up with watering them when they need it and make sure the temperature is just right. Eyeball to see if they need more sun or less sun. You spent all this money and are investing all this time in caring for them, you might as well enjoy the sight of them!

4. Only Water as Needed

Do you know the golden rule of plants? Only water when needed! This means forget any schedule you have in mind and get good at eyeballing the level of dryness that calls for watering.

If is true that underwatering is a better idea than the other option. Too much water can cause rotting, bacterial growth, drowning, and other outcomes that are not good for your plants.

So when should you water your leafy friend? For starts, you should make sure about two inches below the plat where the roots sit, the soil is dry. If the plant looks nice and damp, feels nice and damp, or sticks to your fingers when you test it, you can leave it alone. 2 inches of dryness is the key to watering.

If it is cold out, your plants will need less water than when it is hot. They operate just like humans in this aspect. Dehydration happens much more quickly in the summer. And lastly, make sure you are watering the soil around the plant with nice warm water, where the roots can soak it in. if you are pouring or spritzing water on the leaves, this is not going to do very much good.

5. Minic Their Natural Environment

It is no secret that bringing plants indoors is all the rage right now. But remember, though they can thrive indoors, they were created to be outside. This means keeping it as close to the environment they were made to be in is best for them.

So if you have a tropical plant, you will want to put it in an area of the house that offers humidity and good indirect light. Think places like bathrooms. Another great tip for humidity-welcoming plants is grouping other plants that like this environment together when it gets cold. This will help them keep each other nice and warm/humid! Another good thing to welcome into your space is a humidifier. it is good for you as well as the plants!

If the plants you are bringing into your home function in hot climates, like dry deserts, then lots of direct sunlight and very dry air is best, think dining or living room. You will need to think this way if you are adopting weedy plants, cacti, or succulents. Don't mist these between waterings and put them in the bathroom, they will hate you for it and die on you if you do.

6. Pump the Wheels on the Fertilizer

Though it is a good idea to mimic their natural environment, you do not need to do all the same things you would if your plants lived outside. Fertilizing indoor steps is not a necessary step. This is not the same as gardening, and adding this into your routine could actually hurt more than help. If you absolutely MUST fertilize, only do so in the months where growth is vibrant, also known as the growing months. As it is with water, less is also more with fertilizer. These products tend to be very overwhelming so you may need to mix some water in the fertilizer before you put it on your plants.

We truly do not suggest fertilizing plants that have been with you for less than a year. They tend to be fragile and delicate at this point in time, and you can harm them greatly. After a year when you two are more comfortable with each other, you can fertilize in moderation. Try to use organic or natural fertilizer and don't worry about adding the stuff into new soil (which is already pretty fertile).

All in all, you are getting into dangerous territory if you don't know what you're doing with a bag of fertilizer, especially when it comes to houseplants. Make sure you get some good advice from those who either work with plants or work at stores where plant supplies are sold before you fertilize specific plants. You don't want to defeat yourself in the plant journey before you even start and taking this step out of your routine makes less work for you, achieving the dream of having a bunch of low-maintenance buddies!

7. Local Dealers Are Your Friends

I recently moved and shortly after, passed by a greenhouse and flower shop near me. There is a sort of home-like comfort that comes over me when I am able to find gardener kin and a place I believe in and want to support to deal me all my seeds, tools, pots, flowers, fertilizer, etc. I was so impressed by how beautiful and welcoming the business was.

But what shocked me even more, was the personality and hospitality of the owners. They greeted me with such kindness and presented themselves as those who were willing to help me with anything. It was a step further than just regular customer service. They gave me space to browse but were so helpful when I needed it, gently offering services and advice.

As a fellow plant lover, we naturally share an understanding. I became fast friends with the owners and they suddenly were my trusted dealers. They have proved so reliable. Not only are they reputable and well-loved in the community, but they also provide service to all customers/regulars on a personal level.

Local nurseries and florists are the best bet for a gardener to have. No matter where I have found myself living in the world, even in the most rural areas, there are local nurseries. Actually, there are usually MORE in rural areas, because gardening fits into the slow-paced lifestyle. There are typically many wherever you live to choose from.

Buying all the gardening necessities from a location close-by allows you to ask questions and get answers instantly before making major purchases for your garden. You will find in most places, gardeners are some of the kindest and most helpful people. They are passionate about their craft and wish to help others in any way they can.

They also seriously help you along if you have things you want to learn, and these dealers can easily turn into teachers who you can learn the mysteries of gardening from. Remember, there is no such thing as "arriving" with gardening. There is always something new to learn, incredible ways to grow, and insights to discover from those who came before you in the gardening world.

There are so many more reasons to shop local. For one thing, plants that sit in, supermarkets and department type stores are not properly taken care of. They are treated as all other merchandise, placed inside suffocating and pitch black storage spaces.

The workers are usually knowledgeable, but not first-hand professionals. You will have to be extra careful with how well you check out your plants for things like dying leaves, leaf spots, mildew, and general unhealthy plants and flowers. Green is always best, and it is typically found in local nurseries, owned and managed by first-hand gardeners.

Just like with any other valuable product, having an expert deal it to you is best. Amatures and mega stores are not known for being good for your gardening needs and handling questions in a helpful way. Go green and go local!

8. Always Repot When Needed

Repotting is a necessity for anyone who owns plants at some point down the road. If your plants are kept indoors, this step will come when the plants are outgrowing their pots. At this point, you can either plant them in the ground or get a bigger pot. But repotting does not always mean putting them in a new pot! Sometimes all this will mean is taking the plant out and adding fresh potting soil. Keep in mind that these beings of nature were not meant to stay inside the pot you bought them in. Thankfully, the pots plants are sold in will rarely match your taste for the space you have them in because they are usually cheap and pretty general.

Don't be afraid of repotting or putting in new soil. It will cause more harm to the plant in the long term if you allow them to overgrow and form to the shape of the small pot or not get enough water to the roots because there is not enough space and soil. So much can go wrong when you don't repot. A good way to look at repotting is to choose a planter that is about three inches bigger than the one it is in. You don't want there to be an excessive amount of soil because this means overwatering the roots, so don't move the plant until you are certain the container is the right fit. Oh, and have fun choosing a new pot!  

9. Create Aesthetically Pleasing Drainage for Your Plant  

Next, we need to talk about an aspect of repotting that is vital to the health of your plant. If you want to keep your plant away from the potential of rot, it needs to have drainage. As long as the plant has a way to leak out of some kind of hole at the bottom of our planter, you are set. It's helpful to think of this as your plant needing to be able to relieve itself.

If it cannot use the bathroom, there is no other option than for it to use it all over your window sill, carpet, floor, desk, etc. As you choose a new pot, keeping this necessity in mind, as the pot you purchase the plant in will almost definitely have a system for leakage. The pot itself does not matter, it can be any style you like. From ceramic to glass, but you will need to make sure there are holes.

The reason we want to avoid holes is that if you don't have them, natural overwatering happens because the plant can't release the excess. You could end up drowning your plant or creating rotted roots, both of which are equally bad. After you figure out how to get holes in the bottom, you will need to put some type of tray (it can be aesthetically pleasing!) under the pot.

The good news is that this can be an easy DIY project. You can use the same method as you would with a Terrarium. Add in some form of baselining such as shells, rocks, pebbles, or other similar ingredients. This way you will have an aesthetically pleasing potted plant that is able to get rid of excess water as well as stretch out to its heart's delight.

10. Keep up with Pruning (Especially in the Winter)

Pruning, pruning, pruning. Would you be surprised if I told you that this may be one of the most important aspects of keeping up with your plants. There is a right way and right time to do it, as well as a wrong way and a wrong time. For instance, pruning in the winter is much wiser than pruning in the summer. Let's face it: winter is a bad time for plants. For humans and animals as well. This is when people retreat into their cozy homes and run to their cars to get warm, and where animals hibernate the entire season.

For plants, this season is one of minimal growth, meaning it is not peak time. But on top of not growing, it is also when they get the most diseases. Humans suffer from sickness and low immunity in the winter as well. The cold and lack of sun is just kind of a nightmare for all living things. For this reason, pruning in the winter, especially towards the end of the season, help to keep any sickness at bay that may impact the new growth that is sure to come in the spring.

Wounded limbs can become infected over the winter, allowing diseases to become established when the plant is dormant. Late-winter pruning prevents many naughty diseases from spreading to new growth. The reason winter is an ideal time to prune because your plants are more likely to be damaged if they are outside and have dead leaves if they are inside. Don't sit by and watch or ignore your plants as they need to be pruned because you will "get to it in the spring". Now is the best time to get it under control!

As for how exactly to prune in the winter: make sure you are using sharp, clean tools and making quick, clean cuts to the vines. Good surgery incisions mean quick healing for the patient!

It's important to keep up with pruning in other seasons as well. Remember, pruning is not just a winter activity! As you see dead leaves, spotted leaves, or unhealthy leaves that lack green, it is always better to cut them as soon as possible. It is similar to split ends. Hair will always grow faster and healthier after a fresh trim, and if you wait too long, you will end up having to cut off many inches to get the damage under control later on down the road instead of just making trips to the salon every few months to keep the hair long and healthy.

11. Read to Your Plants

Have you heard the suggestion that everyone talks about, talking to your plants? It's true-- talking to your plants can be so healthy for them (and you). For starters, paying attention to them and giving them TLC is ALWAYS a good thing! But there is a scientific reason to back this as well. Your breath contains carbon dioxide which is great for your plants! Talking to non-living things can be great for you as well! It allows you to plan better, work through frustrations or hard time, and figure out what you will say to someone you love as you confront them.  

If you are at a loss as to what to say to your plants, though, reading to them may be a great way to help them out and care for them. There are a few reasons for this one as well. Not only does this mean you are giving your plant TLC and carbon dioxide, but if you are able to read by your plants, then you must have them sitting in the proper light!

Reading is also great for your own mental stimulation. It can help you to become more emotionally intelligent, empathetic, and kind. It is also a great way to continue learning as you get older, as well as help prevent many aging diseases because of the mental stimulation, such as dementia. Reading and gardening are some of the best hobbies around, so why not combine them?

12. Mist Your Plants Daily 

Misting your plants has so many benefits you may have never heard before, but creating humidity is not one of them. If your plants are craving humidity, then they can thrive best with a humidifier, and it will help you to thrive as well. Misting is a great plant care activity to add to your morning routine. It should look something like coffee, workout, breakfast, reading, and misting your plant (I know mine does)!

But misting regularly can do many other things for plants. Just as using mist is all the rage to keep humans alert, smelling good, combat dryness, freshened and clean, misting plants can have a similar effect. If your plants need a little bit of help in the moisture department, misting them with a spritz every day or so can work wonders. It is also great for new roots to remain healthy and continue to develop at the proper pace. Misting cleans off leaves that can easily and quickly collect dust and grime if they are left to just sit there.

When misting, you can use water with minerals that are good for your specific plants. Makes sure to do your research! Check that the water you use in your bottle is at room temp, as to not shock, threaten, or traumatize your plants. This is as simple as never refrigerating it. Be sure to use what is called "soft water". This means water that has low ions of calcium and magnesium levels. Rainwater and river water are both good examples of soft water.

What if Your Plant Is Dying?

In the case of a dying plant, there are some things you can do to nurse it back to health. If you find yourself in this scenario, don't worry. It is not uncommon for plants to die. Sometimes it's because we left town for too long and they are lacking water, sometimes they are in the sun too much or too little, and other times you have been doing everything perfectly right and you are wondering how you got stuck with a dead plant. I want to bring you some possible reasoning and scenarios for why in the world your plant COULD be dying. It may not be as cryptic or crazy as you may think, and with some plant education, you may be well on your way to reviving your dying plant!

Maybe It Isn't You

Is it possible that you need to pick a different plant to care for? If you are at a total loss as to why in the world your plant is dying when you have cared for it exactly as you should, then you may need to consider that this is not the right plant for you. You may need to look into another type that is more workable for your space or your schedule. There could be reasons that have nothing to do with your plant care at all. You may be the perfect parent, but just don't have some of the needed variables.

One of the reasons out of your control is the issue of sun exposure. If your home only allows for minimal sunlight, but your plant needs a lot of sunlight, then it will not thrive no matter how well you care for it. The only way to prevent this issue from happening is by checking into all the needs of the plant before you buy it. This is why plant research is so important before you buy it and bring it into your space, so you can determine if you have the right atmosphere for it to thrive.

Root Rot

Was there improper drainage like we dove into above, or did you overwater your plant? You will notice then when the plant withers and the leaves are wilting and turning yellow. This is not a fun outcome, but it can easily be fixed and get back on track with some proper care. 

To solve this problem, you will need to clean it all out at this point. Get rid of all the wet soil and clean the roots thoroughly. Cut off the rotten roots, clean out your pot really well, then repot it in dry, healthy soil.

Remember when we told you above not to move your plants around like crazy, because they would become shocked, that they do not adjust well to the frequent change of environments? If you move a plant that needs sunlight out of direct sunlight and into the dark, then they will likely lose leaves because of this change. Remember, moving is a trauma to them. If you are moving them from an outdoor environment to an indoor one, especially in a drastic season like winter, then make this transition a good one. As to not shock them, take your plant back and forth by slowly making their new spot in your house the one that is permanent by transitioning them gently in this way.

Is there a lack of light in your space? You will see the signs if the leaves are getting smaller or lighter, or if they are just not growing as much as they should. Sunlight turns into energy for your plant. It is a vital part of the process of plant growth. Put your plant in a sunny area if you are seeing the symptoms and you should see growth in a few weeks. If you do see good growth, leave it where it is. That means your plant is getting the light it needs!

Issue of Insects 

Are there bugs in your plant? There are tons of bugs that can infest your plants, including those plants that are kept inside. This does not have to mean you get rid of the entire plant, though! First, you will need to determine what kind of bug has overtaken your plant. Once you figure that out (a professional gardener, the people you buy your seeds from Google can call be helpful resources), you will easily be able to determine what kind of harm they are causing to your plants and how to solve the issue.

Depending on how bad it is, you will need to get down to the root of the issue. That means either using tools to scrape the infestation of bugs and their eggs or actually cutting the areas that the bugs are off the plant altogether. Sometimes you will need to vacuum or hose the plant, depending on what is suggested for your specific insect issue.  This is the scenario where insecticide, or pest control, is needed. Good insecticide soap is helpful for keeping new bugs away.

Keep in mind that Google is your friend. You will want to get down and dirty with the research, both into what to do with the infestation, into your specific plant, and into the type of bug that is terrorizing it.

Revive Your Plants

Most people see a dying plant and think they need to just call it a day. This is not always the truth. There are so many ways to help revive it and get it back on track. Look at every single dying leaf as a chance to learn how to care for it better, and learn more about caring for plants in general. 

Plant care is so important. If you hope for vibrant, life-giving, and healthy plants, you will need to keep up with their needs and tend to them consistently. With plants, as with children and pets, the basics are a bit more complicated than you might expect. Watering can be done too much or not enough. Sunlight can be too harsh or too dim.


Plants don't all go together, and it can become a sticky situation for you, the caregiver, if they do not get along and one wants to overrun the other with leaves or weeds. Not all plants fit with your lifestyle, others fit perfectly. When it comes to caring for plants, there are so many fine lines. A little too much or not enough can be bad news whichever way it falls.

1. Give Them Stability and Consistency

We all like change every once in a while. Change of pace, change of setting, change of circumstances. Part of this changing can sometimes consist of rearranging furniture and decorations. This includes plants. If you are looking to properly care for your plants, think consistency. They are not like you, they do not like to change settings every now and then. Actually, change can do much more harm than good.


Consider their natural state. Plants grow out of the ground and they do not move, ever. Their entire life is lived in one place. Give them the same home life stability as you would give a school-aged kid. Instability is a trauma for your greenery, and constant or drastic changes put undue stress and strain on them. Not only do they not need to be moved a ton out of their needed sunlight levels, but they also need the temperature to remain about the same. As a rule of thumb, keep them away from radiators, A/C units, and air vents. They don't life drafts.

2. Find the Right Fit for Your Lifestyle

You need to begin thinking about planting as parenting. Regardless of if you are growing a garden, bringing in houseplants, keeping up a Terrarium or an indoor greenhouse, caring for a large greenhouse, or simply growing herbs in your kitchen windowsill. No matter what form you are planning on caring for, you need to be well informed as to the needs of that specific plant. Remember that with plants, it is NEVER about what the needs of the plants are, but what your needs are. Though you need to think of your plants as kids or pets, there is a way to personalize this living thing to your schedule in a way you can't do with the others.


Are you super busy at work and work long hours, out of the home? Do you travel a ton and on the fly, for work or leisure, for tons of days at a time? Are you just a forgetful person who is not great with added responsibility? Good news, you can own plants! You will get along well with low maintenance plants like succulents, or snake plants.


Look into all the varieties that only need watering a few times a month. Cactuses and succulents will actually like you more if you give them their space. Think of them as your super introverted friend. You can go long stints of time without bugging them but when you do check up on them, they are thriving.


Are you a stay at home/work at home mom/dad, work at home professional, or have a super flexible schedule? Are you a big homebody with normal work hours? Do you not find yourself traveling not too much, but enjoy a quieter, simpler life or have home responsibilities that don't allow for this lifestyle?


If you find yourself with more time on your hands than the first person, then you can tend to more needy and hands-on plants. These include air plants, orchids, and ferns. These call for light watering frequently. 

3. Keep Your Leafy Friends Close Enough to Check on Them

As a general rule, it is a good idea to keep your plants where you can see them! Don't hide them in stuffy places. Not only is the sunlight bad in those areas, but you will also not be able to keep track of when you should be watering them! These plants need all the TLC they can get, especially at first. It will no doubt take some time to fully get to know them on a deep level so all it takes is a single glance to tell what they need.


It's like getting a roommate! Keep your plant on your desk, in your windowsill, on your table, or in other places that are in plain sight. Then watch them. Keep up with watering them when they need it and make sure the temperature is just right. Eyeball to see if they need more sun or less sun. You spent all this money and are investing all this time in caring for them, you might as well enjoy the sight of them!

4. Only Water as Needed

Do you know the golden rule of plants? Only water when needed! This means forget any schedule you have in mind and get good at eyeballing the level of dryness that calls for watering.

If is true that underwatering is a better idea than the other option. Too much water can cause rotting, bacterial growth, drowning, and other outcomes that are not good for your plants.


So when should you water your leafy friend? For starts, you should make sure about two inches below the plat where the roots sit, the soil is dry. If the plant looks nice and damp, feels nice and damp, or sticks to your fingers when you test it, you can leave it alone. 2 inches of dryness is the key to watering.


If it is cold out, your plants will need less water than when it is hot. They operate just like humans in this aspect. Dehydration happens much more quickly in the summer. And lastly, make sure you are watering the soil around the plant with nice warm water, where the roots can soak it in. if you are pouring or spritzing water on the leaves, this is not going to do very much good.


5. Minic Their Natural Environment

It is no secret that bringing plants indoors is all the rage right now. But remember, though they can thrive indoors, they were created to be outside. This means keeping it as close to the environment they were made to be in is best for them.


So if you have a tropical plant, you will want to put it in an area of the house that offers humidity and good indirect light. Think places like bathrooms. Another great tip for humidity-welcoming plants is grouping other plants that like this environment together when it gets cold. This will help them keep each other nice and warm/humid! Another good thing to welcome into your space is a humidifier. it is good for you as well as the plants!


If the plants you are bringing into your home function in hot climates, like dry deserts, then lots of direct sunlight and very dry air is best, think dining or living room. You will need to think this way if you are adopting weedy plants, cacti, or succulents. Don't mist these between waterings and put them in the bathroom, they will hate you for it and die on you if you do.

6. Pump the Wheels on the Fertilizer

Though it is a good idea to mimic their natural environment, you do not need to do all the same things you would if your plants lived outside. Fertilizing indoor steps is not a necessary step. This is not the same as gardening, and adding this into your routine could actually hurt more than help. If you absolutely MUST fertilize, only do so in the months where growth is vibrant, also known as the growing months. As it is with water, less is also more with fertilizer. These products tend to be very overwhelming so you may need to mix some water in the fertilizer before you put it on your plants.


We truly do not suggest fertilizing plants that have been with you for less than a year. They tend to be fragile and delicate at this point in time, and you can harm them greatly. After a year when you two are more comfortable with each other, you can fertilize in moderation. Try to use organic or natural fertilizer and don't worry about adding the stuff into new soil (which is already pretty fertile).


All in all, you are getting into dangerous territory if you don't know what you're doing with a bag of fertilizer, especially when it comes to houseplants. Make sure you get some good advice from those who either work with plants or work at stores where plant supplies are sold before you fertilize specific plants. You don't want to defeat yourself in the plant journey before you even start and taking this step out of your routine makes less work for you, achieving the dream of having a bunch of low-maintenance buddies!

7. Local Dealers Are Your Friends

I recently moved and shortly after, passed by a greenhouse and flower shop near me. There is a sort of home-like comfort that comes over me when I am able to find gardener kin and a place I believe in and want to support to deal me all my seeds, tools, pots, flowers, fertilizer, etc. I was so impressed by how beautiful and welcoming the business was.


But what shocked me even more, was the personality and hospitality of the owners. They greeted me with such kindness and presented themselves as those who were willing to help me with anything. It was a step further than just regular customer service. They gave me space to browse but were so helpful when I needed it, gently offering services and advice.


As a fellow plant lover, we naturally share an understanding. I became fast friends with the owners and they suddenly were my trusted dealers. They have proved so reliable. Not only are they reputable and well-loved in the community, but they also provide service to all customers/regulars on a personal level.


Local nurseries and florists are the best bet for a gardener to have. No matter where I have found myself living in the world, even in the most rural areas, there are local nurseries. Actually, there are usually MORE in rural areas, because gardening fits into the slow-paced lifestyle. There are typically many wherever you live to choose from.


Buying all the gardening necessities from a location close-by allows you to ask questions and get answers instantly before making major purchases for your garden. You will find in most places, gardeners are some of the kindest and most helpful people. They are passionate about their craft and wish to help others in any way they can.


They also seriously help you along if you have things you want to learn, and these dealers can easily turn into teachers who you can learn the mysteries of gardening from. Remember, there is no such thing as "arriving" with gardening. There is always something new to learn, incredible ways to grow, and insights to discover from those who came before you in the gardening world.


There are so many more reasons to shop local. For one thing, plants that sit in, supermarkets and department type stores are not properly taken care of. They are treated as all other merchandise, placed inside suffocating and pitch black storage spaces.


The workers are usually knowledgeable, but not first-hand professionals. You will have to be extra careful with how well you check out your plants for things like dying leaves, leaf spots, mildew, and general unhealthy plants and flowers. Green is always best, and it is typically found in local nurseries, owned and managed by first-hand gardeners.


Just like with any other valuable product, having an expert deal it to you is best. Amatures and mega stores are not known for being good for your gardening needs and handling questions in a helpful way. Go green and go local!

8. Always Repot When Needed

Repotting is a necessity for anyone who owns plants at some point down the road. If your plants are kept indoors, this step will come when the plants are outgrowing their pots. At this point, you can either plant them in the ground or get a bigger pot. But repotting does not always mean putting them in a new pot! Sometimes all this will mean is taking the plant out and adding fresh potting soil. Keep in mind that these beings of nature were not meant to stay inside the pot you bought them in. Thankfully, the pots plants are sold in will rarely match your taste for the space you have them in because they are usually cheap and pretty general.


Don't be afraid of repotting or putting in new soil. It will cause more harm to the plant in the long term if you allow them to overgrow and form to the shape of the small pot or not get enough water to the roots because there is not enough space and soil. So much can go wrong when you don't repot. A good way to look at repotting is to choose a planter that is about three inches bigger than the one it is in. You don't want there to be an excessive amount of soil because this means overwatering the roots, so don't move the plant until you are certain the container is the right fit. Oh, and have fun choosing a new pot!  

9. Create Aesthetically Pleasing Drainage for Your Plant  

Next, we need to talk about an aspect of repotting that is vital to the health of your plant. If you want to keep your plant away from the potential of rot, it needs to have drainage. As long as the plant has a way to leak out of some kind of hole at the bottom of our planter, you are set. It's helpful to think of this as your plant needing to be able to relieve itself.


If it cannot use the bathroom, there is no other option than for it to use it all over your window sill, carpet, floor, desk, etc. As you choose a new pot, keeping this necessity in mind, as the pot you purchase the plant in will almost definitely have a system for leakage. The pot itself does not matter, it can be any style you like. From ceramic to glass, but you will need to make sure there are holes.


The reason we want to avoid holes is that if you don't have them, natural overwatering happens because the plant can't release the excess. You could end up drowning your plant or creating rotted roots, both of which are equally bad. After you figure out how to get holes in the bottom, you will need to put some type of tray (it can be aesthetically pleasing!) under the pot.


The good news is that this can be an easy DIY project. You can use the same method as you would with a Terrarium. Add in some form of baselining such as shells, rocks, pebbles, or other similar ingredients. This way you will have an aesthetically pleasing potted plant that is able to get rid of excess water as well as stretch out to its heart's delight.

10. Keep up with Pruning (Especially in the Winter)

Pruning, pruning, pruning. Would you be surprised if I told you that this may be one of the most important aspects of keeping up with your plants. There is a right way and right time to do it, as well as a wrong way and a wrong time. For instance, pruning in the winter is much wiser than pruning in the summer. Let's face it: winter is a bad time for plants. For humans and animals as well. This is when people retreat into their cozy homes and run to their cars to get warm, and where animals hibernate the entire season.


For plants, this season is one of minimal growth, meaning it is not peak time. But on top of not growing, it is also when they get the most diseases. Humans suffer from sickness and low immunity in the winter as well. The cold and lack of sun is just kind of a nightmare for all living things. For this reason, pruning in the winter, especially towards the end of the season, help to keep any sickness at bay that may impact the new growth that is sure to come in the spring.


Wounded limbs can become infected over the winter, allowing diseases to become established when the plant is dormant. Late-winter pruning prevents many naughty diseases from spreading to new growth. The reason winter is an ideal time to prune because your plants are more likely to be damaged if they are outside and have dead leaves if they are inside. Don't sit by and watch or ignore your plants as they need to be pruned because you will "get to it in the spring". Now is the best time to get it under control!


As for how exactly to prune in the winter: make sure you are using sharp, clean tools and making quick, clean cuts to the vines. Good surgery incisions mean quick healing for the patient!


It's important to keep up with pruning in other seasons as well. Remember, pruning is not just a winter activity! As you see dead leaves, spotted leaves, or unhealthy leaves that lack green, it is always better to cut them as soon as possible. It is similar to split ends. Hair will always grow faster and healthier after a fresh trim, and if you wait too long, you will end up having to cut off many inches to get the damage under control later on down the road instead of just making trips to the salon every few months to keep the hair long and healthy.

11. Read to Your Plants

Have you heard the suggestion that everyone talks about, talking to your plants? It's true-- talking to your plants can be so healthy for them (and you). For starters, paying attention to them and giving them TLC is ALWAYS a good thing! But there is a scientific reason to back this as well. Your breath contains carbon dioxide which is great for your plants! Talking to non-living things can be great for you as well! It allows you to plan better, work through frustrations or hard time, and figure out what you will say to someone you love as you confront them.  


If you are at a loss as to what to say to your plants, though, reading to them may be a great way to help them out and care for them. There are a few reasons for this one as well. Not only does this mean you are giving your plant TLC and carbon dioxide, but if you are able to read by your plants, then you must have them sitting in the proper light!


Reading is also great for your own mental stimulation. It can help you to become more emotionally intelligent, empathetic, and kind. It is also a great way to continue learning as you get older, as well as help prevent many aging diseases because of the mental stimulation, such as dementia. Reading and gardening are some of the best hobbies around, so why not combine them?

12. Mist Your Plants Daily 

Misting your plants has so many benefits you may have never heard before, but creating humidity is not one of them. If your plants are craving humidity, then they can thrive best with a humidifier, and it will help you to thrive as well. Misting is a great plant care activity to add to your morning routine. It should look something like coffee, workout, breakfast, reading, and misting your plant (I know mine does)!


But misting regularly can do many other things for plants. Just as using mist is all the rage to keep humans alert, smelling good, combat dryness, freshened and clean, misting plants can have a similar effect. If your plants need a little bit of help in the moisture department, misting them with a spritz every day or so can work wonders. It is also great for new roots to remain healthy and continue to develop at the proper pace. Misting cleans off leaves that can easily and quickly collect dust and grime if they are left to just sit there.


When misting, you can use water with minerals that are good for your specific plants. Makes sure to do your research! Check that the water you use in your bottle is at room temp, as to not shock, threaten, or traumatize your plants. This is as simple as never refrigerating it. Be sure to use what is called "soft water". This means water that has low ions of calcium and magnesium levels. Rainwater and river water are both good examples of soft water.

What if Your Plant Is Dying?


In the case of a dying plant, there are some things you can do to nurse it back to health. If you find yourself in this scenario, don't worry. It is not uncommon for plants to die. Sometimes it's because we left town for too long and they are lacking water, sometimes they are in the sun too much or too little, and other times you have been doing everything perfectly right and you are wondering how you got stuck with a dead plant. I want to bring you some possible reasoning and scenarios for why in the world your plant COULD be dying. It may not be as cryptic or crazy as you may think, and with some plant education, you may be well on your way to reviving your dying plant!

Maybe It Isn't You

Is it possible that you need to pick a different plant to care for? If you are at a total loss as to why in the world your plant is dying when you have cared for it exactly as you should, then you may need to consider that this is not the right plant for you. You may need to look into another type that is more workable for your space or your schedule. There could be reasons that have nothing to do with your plant care at all. You may be the perfect parent, but just don't have some of the needed variables.


One of the reasons out of your control is the issue of sun exposure. If your home only allows for minimal sunlight, but your plant needs a lot of sunlight, then it will not thrive no matter how well you care for it. The only way to prevent this issue from happening is by checking into all the needs of the plant before you buy it. This is why plant research is so important before you buy it and bring it into your space, so you can determine if you have the right atmosphere for it to thrive.

Root Rot

Was there improper drainage like we dove into above, or did you overwater your plant? You will notice then when the plant withers and the leaves are wilting and turning yellow. This is not a fun outcome, but it can easily be fixed and get back on track with some proper care. 


To solve this problem, you will need to clean it all out at this point. Get rid of all the wet soil and clean the roots thoroughly. Cut off the rotten roots, clean out your pot really well, then repot it in dry, healthy soil.


Remember when we told you above not to move your plants around like crazy, because they would become shocked, that they do not adjust well to the frequent change of environments? If you move a plant that needs sunlight out of direct sunlight and into the dark, then they will likely lose leaves because of this change. Remember, moving is a trauma to them. If you are moving them from an outdoor environment to an indoor one, especially in a drastic season like winter, then make this transition a good one. As to not shock them, take your plant back and forth by slowly making their new spot in your house the one that is permanent by transitioning them gently in this way.


Is there a lack of light in your space? You will see the signs if the leaves are getting smaller or lighter, or if they are just not growing as much as they should. Sunlight turns into energy for your plant. It is a vital part of the process of plant growth. Put your plant in a sunny area if you are seeing the symptoms and you should see growth in a few weeks. If you do see good growth, leave it where it is. That means your plant is getting the light it needs!

Issue of Insects 

Are there bugs in your plant? There are tons of bugs that can infest your plants, including those plants that are kept inside. This does not have to mean you get rid of the entire plant, though! First, you will need to determine what kind of bug has overtaken your plant. Once you figure that out (a professional gardener, the people you buy your seeds from Google can call be helpful resources), you will easily be able to determine what kind of harm they are causing to your plants and how to solve the issue.


Depending on how bad it is, you will need to get down to the root of the issue. That means either using tools to scrape the infestation of bugs and their eggs or actually cutting the areas that the bugs are off the plant altogether. Sometimes you will need to vacuum or hose the plant, depending on what is suggested for your specific insect issue.  This is the scenario where insecticide, or pest control, is needed. Good insecticide soap is helpful for keeping new bugs away.


Keep in mind that Google is your friend. You will want to get down and dirty with the research, both into what to do with the infestation, into your specific plant, and into the type of bug that is terrorizing it.

Revive Your Plants

Most people see a dying plant and think they need to just call it a day. This is not always the truth. There are so many ways to help revive it and get it back on track. Look at every single dying leaf as a chance to learn how to care for it better, and learn more about caring for plants in general. 


​Final Thoughts on ​the Olive Oil Mister

A good olive oil mister, in my opinion, is the Fine Life Ideal Olive Oil Mister. It’s elegant looking, has a good capacity for cooking or serving, is made from high-quality and food-safe ingredients, and it provides a good mist for use. I think it’s a great choice because it checks all the boxes for quality and functionality, and it just works really well compared to some of the other products out there.

I hope that you feel better about making your own choice now, and that you can ready reviews with ease, knowing what they’re talking about!

Dianne T. Lampe
 

Hi there, I’m Dianne! Welcome to a one-stop shop for your gardening needs. We aim here to offer up a very wide range of information about many aspects of gardening. From flowers and planting through to vegetables and accessories, find all the information you need here. We have a true passion for everything green. We’re highly motivated to develop this site continuously and offer any insights we can alongside useful facts and handy hints. Please get in touch and let us know what you would like us to cover. Thoughts and feedback are always welcomed. Enjoy!

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